How Big A Compressor for Home Shop?

Discussion in 'DIY / Self Sufficiency' started by NewBoots, Jan 12, 2019.

  1. The new place we will be moving to will have a 20 x 20 shed with a big area for a work shop (weeeee!) and since I'll be building a coop or 2 and probably some rabbit hutches and maybe even install hardwood flooring in the house, I'll have an excus... um good reason to have a good set of power tools and it seems that flooring nail guns and other heavy duty nail guns are all pneumatic. So I need some idea how big a compressor I should get.
    Lay it on me folks!
     
  2. 21hens-incharge

    21hens-incharge Addict

    12,972
    45,517
    1,292
    Mar 9, 2014
    Northern Colorado
    NewBoots and muddy75 like this.
  3. I can't get that link to work whether I click on it or copy and paste it. Sorry.
     
  4. muddy75

    muddy75 Crowing

    915
    5,294
    336
    Aug 17, 2018
    southern indiana
    I agree that portability should be a main concern as it sounds like many of your planned projects may need on-site completion. A good 110V with wheels should be enough to run the pneumatic tools you are talking about. I believe ours is a dewalt currently. big wheels for portability! I’ve had all types (even managed to fit a large 220v model in the back of a toyota fj once to get it home!). been most happy with the dewalt for home use, and a california tools model that I’ve been running at the office now for 3 years (multiple port, and very quiet) found it on amazon.
     
    NewBoots and 21hens-incharge like this.
  5. 21hens-incharge

    21hens-incharge Addict

    12,972
    45,517
    1,292
    Mar 9, 2014
    Northern Colorado
    NewBoots likes this.
  6. Thanks all and how can I tell how much power (pressure, volts?) I need for a given tool?
     
  7. Gargoyle

    Gargoyle Chiseler

    4,021
    4,708
    472
    Apr 13, 2011
    Fox Valley, IL
    My Coop
    Here's a lot of info on tools and required cubic feet per minute (cfm) and pounds per square inch (psi).

    https://www.quincycompressor.com/know-much-pressure-need-given-situation/

    The typical home improvement store or harbor freight compressors don't last. In heavy usage they tend to burn out in two to three years, in light home/hobby use they might be good for twice that.

    For reliability, look for things like a two stage compressor with a cast iron head, not a single stage with an aluminum head. Also, a larger tank reduces start/stop cycles, which will extend the life of the compressor.
     
  8. Acre4Me

    Acre4Me Crowing

    1,967
    3,367
    327
    Nov 12, 2017
    Western Ohio
    I can’t tell you about compressors, other than portability is important. Good luck though! A new place and space! Have fun!
     
    NewBoots likes this.
  9. Since it will mostly be light building, do you think that an assortment of dewalt or other dependable cordless tools be preferable? I see they even have cordless framing nail guns and circular saws.
     
    JesusHChicken likes this.
  10. Gargoyle

    Gargoyle Chiseler

    4,021
    4,708
    472
    Apr 13, 2011
    Fox Valley, IL
    My Coop
    I own three compressors- a small and large portable, and my shop compressor with an 80 gallon tank. I run air tools all day, but for basic carpentry tasks (drills, circular saw, etc) I use cordless tools. Much more flexible, I'm not limited to working where I have hoses or running extra hoses around the shop. (this despite the fact that I have maybe 8 different hose connection points around my shop).

    I'm using Makita brushless tools- expensive, and the batteries cost a small fortune, but they are really dependable and get good battery life. However, for angle grinders I use plug in electric, the cordless consume battery life too fast, and the pneumatic ones don't have the same torque.

    I do have a pneumatic nailer, it is really nice to use.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by: