How can i control my Shamo?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by NatureFanatic, Nov 5, 2014.

  1. NatureFanatic

    NatureFanatic Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 4, 2014
    I have shamo i think its not a pure breed but i think it has a large shamo bloodline with my cock.

    I leash my shamo and so aggressive, how can i stop or be not a man fighter? i learn a lot here but idea in being aggressive with people is not a natural for shamo.
     
  2. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    Well, while I don't believe there's anything much to be done for the overwhelming majority of all 'manfighters', I'm aware there is always the exception to the rule. Myself, I'd cull him. He's not representing good breed type at all and there's every chance his offspring will be just like him. It takes an aberrant mindset for him to want to attack humans in the first place.

    Leashing him may only be increasing his aggression, but perhaps it's your only option, I don't know. Certainly caging or leashing would have to be done anyway, for both his safety and yours.

    I use shackles on very aggressive birds when necessary to transport them or when I must temporarily cage them with others, but it's a short term thing before I cull them. Anyway, point being it can help convince them to stop charging potential victims. With shackles he may be safe to roam free.

    My idea of a shackle is a soft, rounded shoelace, with one end tied around each ankle, with just enough room for a normal length stride (not a running stride) left in the string between the ankles. This enables them to jump up onto perches, and down from them, and dustbathe, and mate, and scratch around and do all those normal behaviors, but when they try to charge at an intended victim, they fall flat on their faces.

    Very quickly they learn to not try to leap at anything any more, and while it won't change their mentality it will teach them not to act on it. You have to tie the loops so securely that they won't slip over his feet or up his legs, but also won't slip tighter or looser. If you don't know how to tie non-slip knots it's a good time to look some up, if you choose to do this method.

    He will probably flop and kick for a bit as he learns to walk with them but most birds have it sorted in moments. But he'll be aware of them and if he finds they break, he'll just go back to what he was doing before.

    You could try 'centrarchid' on this forum, if you PM him he may have some useful info as he reckons over a period of years he reformed one man-fighting hen, but I've seen no proof anybody's permanently reformed a man-fighter so I'm obviously not trying to offer you any false hopes.

    Surely, someone has done it; if centrarchid reckons he did then I believe him, although it sounds like it took far longer than I'd bother with and even then the chicks continued to take after the parents' aggressive ways without careful training themselves.

    If you do try to rehabilitate this animal, be aware that it may take you years of daily work for the rest of his life possibly, and you may have to repeat this very same behavior for many generations, and many years, with the next generations descended from him.

    Best wishes.
     
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  3. NatureFanatic

    NatureFanatic Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you for knowledgeable info.. Correction with my leash i think it is a shackles im using for.

    I think i need to find another good quality for shamo breed. :)
     
  4. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    You're welcome. Best of luck to you. :)
     

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