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How can no Parole mean living in a halfway house?

Discussion in 'Family Life - Stories, Pictures & Updates' started by terrilhb, Apr 18, 2011.

  1. terrilhb

    terrilhb Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 11, 2010
    Georgia
    Ok to make a long story short. A few years ago I was a victim in a armed robbery. The guy who worked with us for a year set up the robbery. 2 guys came in with guns and the one shot a fellow employee. He was 18 then.(He lived thank God). They caught all 3. It was a horrible event and messed me up for a long time. Anyway last year 1 got out after serving his time. Now today I get an email that 1 of the others that is in prison in PA is being sent to Columbia SC to live in a halfway house. He is not supposed to be released until April of 2012. The shooter is still locked up supposedly till 2014. The one getting sent to SC will only be 1 hour from me. I know this probably makes no sense and I am probably overreacting but I am scared to death. It was my testimony that got him locked up. I was the only one that saw everything. The poor guy who was shot remembered nothing. And the other employees were in the other room during the shooting. I just needed to vent. Thanks for listening.
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2011
  2. Spookwriter

    Spookwriter Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Feb 23, 2010
    Ohio
    How involved were you in the robbery? Did you get to help plan it?
    When I first read the post, I thought it sounded as if you were indeed
    one of the robber-people.

    You were the robbed?

    But....neither you nor your testimony resulted in the robbers being locked up.
    It was their own actions that led to that result. You didn't cause them to break
    the law...poor decisions lead to poor results.

    But if you need to get into the witness protection plan here, we can get you a
    place on an EMU ranch or something...
     
  3. welsummerchicks

    welsummerchicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 26, 2010
    You might want to change 'I was involved in' to 'I was the victim of', if that's accurate. I thought you meant you were INVOLVED in the robbery, not involved like being a victim.

    I am not sure any of them would realize who had testified against them unless you stood up in court. If the case went to a judge (as they often do these days), it's not likely that they know who testified, or which testimony was more important than the other.

    THAT SAID, I'd make sure there were no clues to lead them to you. For example, if you have the same phone number, email or address, or still work at the same place, I think it's possible one of them could find you. I would change phone numbers and emails. As far as if they know your address or place of employ that's harder to change but if you're just renting or doing temp work it would be easy to change those things.

    If I was in that sort of situation, I'd go with sensible and reasonable caution and sensible and reasonable efforts to not make it easy to find you.

    HOWEVER, THAT SAID, I think that after an armed robbery in which someone died, they are not too likely to do a crime that would so obviously be pointing directly to them, or to do something that would mess with their parole or other forms of out-of-jailed-ness.

    Half way houses are used these days for sentencing, and they have varying levels of security. I looked into one a couple months ago and was absolutely shocked at how restrictive it was. I thought they had some sort of picnic there (believing a news story again, which I already know better than to do). It is no picnic in most of those places. Someone is watching every single move.

    Usually, if someone breaks the rules, any of the rules, they go back to a higher level of security - jail. Bothering you would mean breaking the rules. And they know that.

    If the person contacts you, that most likely is included in 'breaking the rules'. If they contact you, I'd be sure you contact their parole officer or other authority, and let those guys know.

    If anyone DOES contact you, I'd advise you to be sure the authorities know, and take advantage of any steps they can take.

    Sometimes people come out of jail very bitter and angry. Sometimes they come out thinking they'll be very smart and stay out of trouble 'for a while'. And sometimes they come out and really do not EVER want to go through that again, and decide to stay away from trouble. Some people come out truly believing things will be different but gradually slip back into old habits once they get back in the same environment.

    In that case, you might get contacted with an apology for everything that happened. But I think it takes a very unusual person to do that. And if I did get an apology, I'd say, 'thanks so much' and not discuss any personal info, location, name of employer, etc. Even if they are truly sorry the feeling might not last.
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2011
  4. Squishy

    Squishy Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 2, 2011
    Florida
    Oh, I understood what you meant.

    As suggested... Make sure they don't already know your address, you work, your phone, ect... and then inform your current employer, kids school, ect ect, that under no circumstances should your contact info be given out to anyone (work especially), tossed in the trash, or left out in public areas.. and make sure your number is not in the phone book, online, ect... and as Welsummer said, make sure you have the number for the parole officer.

    Once you are certain of all those things, just keep on living your life and push this all to the back of your mind.. try not to think about it, and eventually the fear will ebb, and fade away. But keep thinking of it all the time, and you may find it very hard to find peace and be happy.

    Wishing you well [​IMG]
     
  5. easttxchick

    easttxchick Lone Star Call Ducks

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    Quote:Yeah, I knew what you meant, too. [​IMG]
    Call your local PD or Sheriffs Dept. and express your concerns.
    Get a big dog and a conceal carry permit. Guarantee you, that's what I would do.
    It's awful that you're even having to worry about this.
     
  6. terrilhb

    terrilhb Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 11, 2010
    Georgia
    I changed it. No I did not help with it. I am so sorry I misworded it. I was really upset when I posted the post. Please forgive me.
     
  7. welsummerchicks

    welsummerchicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 26, 2010
    It definitely read like you were upset.
     
  8. redhen

    redhen Kiss My Grits... Premium Member

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    Western MA
    Usually people in those half way houses get free community time.. to go to work and such.... and they are VERY easy to escape from.
    Pretty scary that he'll be on the streets again..and the shooter soon too. Makes me SO sick how easy they go on these violent criminals....
    Gah!! [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  9. terrilhb

    terrilhb Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 11, 2010
    Georgia
    I was. I got an email that this was happening. I have 4 big dogs and guns. I do not live in the same place anymore. Everyone around me tells me I am worrying about nothing. But I can not help it. His lawyer put me through hell on the witness stand for the trial. Thank you all for listening and responding. I can not help how I feel. My panic attacks have kicked back in. Thanks again
     
  10. mulewagon

    mulewagon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 13, 2010
    Alabama
    [​IMG] Big hug for you, hon! That's a scary situation, though I sincerely hope nothing will come of it.

    Are you able to get any help from the Victim-Witness Asistance program? http://www.pacga.org/vs/helpful_links.shtml
     

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