HOw do I best prevent diseases in our healthy hens?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Sozoed, Oct 13, 2011.

  1. Sozoed

    Sozoed Out Of The Brooder

    36
    0
    22
    Apr 8, 2011
    What preventative vaccinations or deworming should I do to prevent diseases? Our pullets are 9 months old and regular egg layers.
     
  2. ninabeast

    ninabeast Chillin' With My Peeps

    775
    7
    121
    Apr 10, 2011
    Upstate New York
    [​IMG]
     
  3. Sozoed

    Sozoed Out Of The Brooder

    36
    0
    22
    Apr 8, 2011
    (Smilies are a little whacko for me today...will this print [​IMG]?)
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2011
  4. GoldDogsMom

    GoldDogsMom Chillin' With My Peeps

    850
    8
    111
    Aug 10, 2011
    Indiana, PA
    I'm waiting to see what answers you get too! I have read here to put Apple Cider Vinegar in their water but not sure how much or how often the water would need to be changed out...
     
  5. LarryPQ

    LarryPQ Easter Hatch!!

    10,884
    22
    291
    Jul 17, 2009
    The best and most important thing you can do is to keep a closed flock. No one in our out, and don't have a bajillion BYCers come in and out. [​IMG]

    Vaccines:
    IB/Newcastle
    Fowl Pox
    Mareks

    Those are the big ones.
     
  6. Clay Valley Farmer

    Clay Valley Farmer Chillin' With My Peeps

    739
    6
    121
    Sep 7, 2010
    Closed flock

    X2

    No rescues, no taking give aways, no birds from auctions, want ads or unknown sources. Best to stick with hatching eggs or chicks from a tested source.

    Other than that, plenty of space, a clean coop and good quality food. Feeding cayane pepper, ACV or other herbal profolactics or remidies if they are of any proven value are going to be much much less importaint than basic animal husbandry.​
     
  7. Beekissed

    Beekissed True BYC Addict

    I don't advocate for vaccinations or chemical dewormers, so I can only tell you how I do it.

    Start with hardy breeds that do well in my climate
    Free range
    Clean water with a dollop of unpastuerized apple cider vinegar in it(make sure you are not using a galvanized metal container)
    Whole grains mixed into laying mash and only fed once a day and just what they can clean up in one setting with only a little left over for lesser flock members
    Good ventilation in the coop
    Deep litter that is not moist or smelly~I throw BOSS in it for the gals to keep it fluffed and dry
    Extra OS or their own shells in the feed during stress times like peak laying season or molt
    Grit free choice when the snows cover the ground
    Fermented pumpkins in the early spring/late winter
    A dab of Shaklee's soap in the water once in a while
    Cull for non productive egg laying patterns, slow or no recovery from molt, consistently poor appearance
    No meds, no vaccines, no chemical dewormers
    No supplemental heat or light in the winter

    As of yet, this regimen has yielded very healthy flocks with no illnesses recorded over all these years. Current flock age is 5-6 years and still laying every day or every other day in peak laying season.
     
  8. Clay Valley Farmer

    Clay Valley Farmer Chillin' With My Peeps

    739
    6
    121
    Sep 7, 2010
    Also another secret to a healthy flock is cull relentlessly, don't tolerate weak or sickly birds that pass along weak genes or can become an infection vector to the healthy birds.
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2011
  9. Sozoed

    Sozoed Out Of The Brooder

    36
    0
    22
    Apr 8, 2011
    I am a newbie chicken owner, so bear with my questions here: If I cull a diseased bird, does it depend on the disease whether or not we can butcher and eat the meat? What diseases should we not butcher/eat the bird?
     
  10. Sozoed

    Sozoed Out Of The Brooder

    36
    0
    22
    Apr 8, 2011
    Beekissed, when you say no supplemental light in the winter, some hens stop laying altogether in the winter to decreased light. What's the danger of a lightbulb in the coop for say 3 hours at dusk?
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by