How do I examine chickens to see if they are healthy?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by ChickenGurl15, Feb 21, 2015.

  1. ChickenGurl15

    ChickenGurl15 Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 11, 2015
    Bailey, Colorado.
    Im new to this website, and i LOVE it already. Once my mom said we were getting chicks, that is all that's on my mind now, lol. (I think she is sick of me jabbering about them constantly) I don't have chickens YET, getting them as tiny beebee chicks in June. But when I do, i want to examine them everyday to keep their health in check. One of my Uncles hens died this morning from pasty~butt...i thought only chicks got that! If one of my future chickens do get sick, how do i treat them? What parts of their bodies do I check? What does a sick chicken act like, and what does a healthy chicken act like? I'd be very thankful to hear some expert~answers!!! ~Emily
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    Last edited: Feb 21, 2015
  2. LRH97

    LRH97 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Congratulations! Jabber all you want about them. They're very rewarding and fun to have around and poultry keeping is a great hobby to get into. [​IMG] My best advice to give you would be to research, research, research. Look up common poultry illnesses, as each illness will likely have its own distinct symptoms. A good place to start is here at BYC. Generally speaking, a healthy bird is one who has bright eyes, and is acting normally (i.e. eating, scratching around, and all in all being a part of the flock). A bird who is sitting fluffed up in a corner or on a roost and acting lethargic and acting kind of isolated could be ill. After you've had your birds a while, you will pretty well be able to tell when a girl (or boy!) is not acting like his/her self. Another thing, never be afraid to ask questions. If you're ever unsure about anything, start a thread here to get advice. We're here to help. I still learn new stuff every day. [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  3. ChickenGurl15

    ChickenGurl15 Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 11, 2015
    Bailey, Colorado.
    Thanks so much! Every time im online, I HAVE to look at something chicken~related. I've learned alot already and wish our lil peeps would arrive here earlier! I'll keep doing alot of research until i know almost everything about them, lol.
     
  4. ChickenGurl15

    ChickenGurl15 Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 11, 2015
    Bailey, Colorado.
    Please keep the comments coming!!
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  5. chickengeorgeto

    chickengeorgeto Overrun With Chickens

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    I am unsure of what killed your Uncle's hen but my recommendation is to keep your birds isolated from your Uncle's and never go from his flock to your flock without changing your shoes, clothing and washing any skin that was exposed to his flock.

    A healthy chicken will feel lively and energetic in your hand. A sickly one not so much. This is something that must be learned and can not be taught.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2015
  6. ChickenGurl15

    ChickenGurl15 Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 11, 2015
    Bailey, Colorado.
    I live about 2~3 miles away from my Uncle. But good advice, Because he really just has chickens for laying eggs and meat. He dosent check their bodies for any types of infestations, and he killed his crowing roo cuz his neighbors were getting mad, so he now has a mean hen who pecks all the feathers off the other hens rumps. He started off with 18 birds, now he has about 8~9. He is getting 25 new birds for meat despite his teeny weeny coop. Well, at least I have a good example of how NOT to raise my chickens, lol. (no offense against my Uncle though) He is much older than me. (he is in his 50's, and im 15) But maybe i can share some of the tips I've learned so he can have a healthy flock.
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  7. Sonya9

    Sonya9 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Might want to tell him jamming all of the meat birds in with the layers in a tiny coup will cause overcrowding and could easily stress his laying hens causing them to slow down their egg production.

    If he doesn't care about the well being of the birds he probably DOES care about egg/food production.
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2015
  8. ChickenGurl15

    ChickenGurl15 Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 11, 2015
    Bailey, Colorado.
    Honestly he should build a bigger coop. But he might not agree with me :s He is going to eat his now remaining hens, so he can get new ones. Wish I knew the size of his coop, but my best guestimate is 7 ft by 4 ft. But his nesting boxes take up alot of space. He does put ACV in their water. They seem happy, but they arnt used to being picked up, making them extremely skittish.
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  9. Egghead_Jr

    Egghead_Jr Overrun With Chickens

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    Parasites are the most common health issue with chickens. If you burn with wood or have access to wood ash you can use it for dust baths. Excellent preventative measure. I've seen folks use old kiddy pools with 3+ inches of ash for the birds. They'll love it and will cut down on them tearing up the yard.
     
  10. ChickenGurl15

    ChickenGurl15 Out Of The Brooder

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    Bailey, Colorado.
    Thats good news, cuz we burn wood in our wood stove.
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