How do I know who is laying?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by roorooyew, Sep 11, 2016.

  1. roorooyew

    roorooyew Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 4, 2016
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    I have a RR I rescued. She is about a year and lays deep brown spotted jumbo eggs. She is my smallest hen. My 23 weekers are twice her size. In the past few days group A or B has started to lay. A are 23 weeks and B are 20 weeks. Im assumimg its the same hen because the eggs look identical and there has been one a day for about a week. A day break and then another this morning. They are much smaller than the RR and are a light tan.
    Here are my breeds....Delware, BR, Newhamshire Reds. These are the only ones that could be playing. All others breeds are to young and in seperate quarters. On top of that my roo mounted gracefully today. This is the first time ive seen him do this and im watching constantly lol. However he didnt look like a beginner and only seems intrested in the older RR. So, here is my egg, and again i know its not the RR. Hers are huge and dark brown.
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  2. redsoxs

    redsoxs Chicken Obsessed

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  3. roorooyew

    roorooyew Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 4, 2016
    North Carolina
  4. Pork Pie Ken

    Pork Pie Ken Monkey Business Premium Member

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    Typically, the first eggs from any pullet will be considerably smaller than they will be three months down the line. I have read (although not tried) that a member has put food dye on the vent of a suspected layer - the egg showing signs of the food dye in question.

    CT
     
  5. redsoxs

    redsoxs Chicken Obsessed

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    Smaller yes because they are young. The shading may be explained by variations in individual birds. Typically the first eggs are the darkest.
     

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