How do I trim my chicken's nails?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by Love my Critters!, Apr 18, 2008.

  1. Love my Critters!

    Love my Critters! Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have silkie chickens and they all are free range. Some of them have really long nails, I'm assuming because with their extra toes not all of them scrape the ground when they walk and scratch. What is the best way to go about trimming their nail. My guys are very gentle and easy to pick up.

    Thanks!

    Nail Trim AHHHH..... [​IMG]
     
  2. d.k

    d.k red-headed stepchild

    * Use a bright mini-flashlight to locate the red quick and cut full quarter-inch AWAY from it. And *always* have cornstarch or some other clotter to hand just in case!
     
  3. EweSheep

    EweSheep Flock Mistress

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    I use dog cllippers and like DK says, I would say the same thing.

    I, too, have bantams that has long nails and so are the caged baby chicklets! Have to keep them trimmed once every eight weeks or less depending how fast they grow.
     
  4. myhenSunrise

    myhenSunrise Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I just trimmed my chickens nails, and one of them got cut too short after she moved, and now it's bleeding, I was hoping there is a way to help it clot faster?!
     
  5. 123RedBeard

    123RedBeard Chillin' With My Peeps

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    A little corn starch or flour on the end will plug it up, and fall off on its own after the bleeding stops.
     
  6. myhenSunrise

    myhenSunrise Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks!
     
  7. daphnelee

    daphnelee Out Of The Brooder

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    So, what about a banty rooster's spurs? Can those be clipped, trimmed or filed?
     
  8. daphnelee

    daphnelee Out Of The Brooder

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    I know God puts us where He wants us at the right time!

    Earlier today, I searched and read up on cutting my chicken's nails, as i have on other various subjects I've been dealing with within my flock of 17.

    So, this evening, my hubby and I cut my silkie's nails because some were extremely long. As I was holding her & hubby was clipping, he noticed her "butt" protruding! I turned her over & saw a prolapsed vent. After putting antibiotic ointment on my gloved fingers, I gently started to push it back in and realized she had an egg stuck. I "helped" it out and then carefully massaged the tissue back into place. She seemed VERY relieved! The egg was not finished developing; very opaque and pliable. I'm glad I was there at the right time! She's back in the coop tonight. All is good!

    Thank you, BYC, for this website, the forums, and all the input from its members! I would not have known what to do if I hadn't subscribed to this group and read all i have read! I am, oh, so grateful!

    Here's a picture of the little girl![​IMG]
     
  9. azygous

    azygous Chicken Obsessed

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    OMG! You did dodge a big bullet! Or the Silkie hen did!

    You asked about rooster spurs. They can be trimmed, much like a toe nail, but an even better way of managing spurs is to simply twist them off with pliers. What's left is a fleshy nub that hardens over the next few days and begins adding layers of cutaneous material again. I spray with Vetermycin[​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    for a few days until they dry and harden.

    The advantage to removing instead of just trimming is you won't have to deal with them again for a year.

    There are a ton of videos showing how it's done. A person with strong fingers doesn't even need pliers. Just grasp the spur at the base, twist gently back and forth until the spur loosens, then lift off. You'll be amazed how easy it is.

    I just recently removed spurs from my three-year old Welsummer hen. Her spurs had grown to over an inch and I was getting concerned she would get them caught on something and break her leg. That's what happened to a Brahma rooster and he ended up dying from his injuries.
     
  10. daphnelee

    daphnelee Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you for your response! This is great information!
    None of my hens have spurs to contend with, but the two roos definitely do. My silkie roo has some vicious daggers. He protects ALL my girls, but I'm fearful that he could injure one of them with his masculinity! (Even the girls double his size!)

    The Silver Seabright is quarantined, due to an eye infection. (Looks like an egg yoke substance each time i clean it out & dr him.) I may leave his spurs alone. He is the less aggressive of the two roos and may need to defend himself when integrated back into the flock.

    Y'all have a good day!
     

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