How do you cull a chick?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by gardenknitter, May 25, 2010.

  1. gardenknitter

    gardenknitter Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 26, 2010
    I hate, hate, hate to ask this. [​IMG] But if a chick needs culled, how do you do it? [​IMG]
     
  2. NurseNettie

    NurseNettie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 13, 2008
    Northern Maine
    There have been a ton of threads here addressing such things. I'd do a search and read all the pros and cons of each.

    Whatever your choice ( should the need arise) make it swift. PLEASE do not try one of the "suffocation" methods that have been discussed. I've read more horror stories that chicks are still alive after hours. I can't imagine the suffering they have gone through, just to put US at peace, and not have to do the deed ourselves.
    There are lots of discussions about using vinegar and baking soda in a closed container, or putting a chick in the freezer to "put it to sleep". I just ask you-- do you want to suffocate or freeze to death. I can't imagine the pain. These are my opinions, and I'm sure you'll get others saying " it worked for me". I'm sure it may have, but I'm one who won't risk the suffering.

    Small chicks ( day olds, etc) are small enough to use a sharp pair of scissors or shears ( very sharp). You can snip off their head, and it's over quickly. Hand held pruning shears, new or just sharpened, are VERY sharp and do a very quick job. ( I actually cut my finger with a pair of Fiskars pruners yesterday.... very bad cut, very deep, very fast- had it been a different angle, my finger would no longer be attached) If you can't watch, a sock or small bag over their head will help you ( don't try to cut through it though, only use what you must to not have to look). Others will pull their heads off ( yes, gruesome, but also quick if done without hesitation)

    If you can't do it, you may have a friend or aquaintance who's willing to do it for you. Sometimes people without the attachment to the animal can be quicker. If you're going to do it, I suggest, getting everything you need to perform the task, and disposal ready, and just go do it. Don't think about it, just do it, and it'll be over quickly for the bird. If you have a breakdown later, that's fine ( not really for you, but for the bird), but get through the task first, so that you don't cause undue harm or suffering to the bird.

    Small chicks are really too small for axes, or large implements. They're also too small to shoot ( we have shot some of our larger birds that required culling, at close range with buckshot or birdshot- very fast)

    I wish you luck, it's a very hard, but necessary thing to have to do with our hobby. [​IMG]

    Quote:
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2010
  3. gardenknitter

    gardenknitter Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 26, 2010
    Thanks a bunch for the info Nurse Nettie. I know I couldn't personally do it. [​IMG] But the good news is that the chick in question has made a sudden turn for the better!!!!!!! [​IMG] I think he is going to be ok. [​IMG]
     
  4. bigdaddyabc

    bigdaddyabc Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 5, 2010
    Greer
    I had to cull one Saturday. The previous post was chock full of good ideas about the act itself, but I would like to point out that the most important part of what was said was the QUICK and DON'T THINK ABOUT IT part. The less you agonize and fret, the better for both parties involved. Just be done with it and be sad after. My poor chick was suffering, and could have passed its illness to the whole flock. Spock said it best...."the needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few, or the one". Glad yours is doing better, hope it keeps up! should the problem arise again, just be quick about it.
     
  5. rhea

    rhea Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 30, 2008
    Engine starter (ether), sprayed on a cotton ball, placed over the nares. It is instant and painless, if it must be done.
     
  6. gardenknitter

    gardenknitter Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 26, 2010
    Rhea...that is one I might be able to do. I was wondering this morning if there was a method like that. My chick did take a turn for the worse. He is dying. [​IMG] I have him in a little nest of his own. Doesn't seem to be suffering, he's pretty out of it.
     
  7. CoopCrazy

    CoopCrazy Brooder Boss

    Mar 3, 2009
    Columbus,IN
    Quote:This is exactly what the other poster was talking about .. Trying to use chemicals is cruel in miy opimnion.. Im sorry but I have seen animals in a gas chamber and it is horrible , not to mention that every week som eone is on here trying one of these methods only to come back on crying because it suffered or didnt work etc... Just get you some scissors and snip if you are afraid it will hurt then stun it first by hitting its head on a hard surface.. It is tough but that is part of the responsibilty in caring for these creatures...
     
  8. CoopCrazy

    CoopCrazy Brooder Boss

    Mar 3, 2009
    Columbus,IN
    How old is the Chick ?
    If its veruy young you can also just put it in a paper bag and put it in the freezer they are soo susceptible to cold it takes moments for them to fall asleep and only about 20 more to pass completly.. I have done it when I couldnt stom ach to cut off the head and it worked great not a peep from the chick and i just waited a few hours before removing the whole bag and burying it...
     
  9. volchick

    volchick Out Of The Brooder

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    May 20, 2010
    I'm going to have to do away with one today that's not yet 24 hrs old. I'm trying to figure out a way that will keep the chick as intact as possible because my animal loving 6 yo dd is devastated over the whole situation and I know we are going to have to have some kind of burial or something...
     
  10. CoopCrazy

    CoopCrazy Brooder Boss

    Mar 3, 2009
    Columbus,IN
    Quote:Defintly would use the freezer method .. It worked great never a peep and it is dark on the bag so it wont run wround or try to get out....
     

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