how do you get a new color recognized?

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by that_crazy_lady, Dec 17, 2009.

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  1. that_crazy_lady

    that_crazy_lady Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm going to be breeding for blue laced red, and blue laced silver Sebrights. and I got to woundering, what do it take to get a new color into the breed standerd?
     
  2. delawaregirl09

    delawaregirl09 Chillin' With My Peeps

    I think you have to have a significant amount of people with the birds... But I'm not sure [​IMG] I'd like to know too!
     
  3. Boggy Bottom Bantams

    Boggy Bottom Bantams Overrun With Chickens

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    an act of congress!! One person's breeding is not going to cut it. Not sure of all the actual courses of action, but no, just because we come up with a special color ourselves, they arent going to admit it into the standard without a note from the President
     
  4. Professional

    Professional Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:It's not quite so dramatic. It's actually a rather simple, straightforward process. The main two considerations are that the breed or variety breed true, with QUALITY representatives which display a close resemblance to the standard, and there need be enough serious exhibitors to make it worth the effort and expense to recognize the new creation. Yes, there is expense involved, and breeders need to be seriously committed to establishing the new breed or variety. The governing organizations are not going to take seriously a lone breeder who claims to have created a new breed or variety, simply by crossbreeding over a few generations. In Sebrights, you already have the buff laced, which exists, in quantity and quailty, yet still has not created enough of a following to justify that it even be presented for recognition. What makes you think that your new creation will surpass those in quality and quantity, even in your lifetime, to qualify for recognition, when the buffs still have not?

    For the rules on how to present a new breed or variety for recognition, one only need to join the governing bodies of the fancy, the American Poultry Association and the American Bantam Association. The rules are clearly explained in each yearbook. I suggest that if you haven't yet demonstrated the dedication even to that level of becoming involved in the process, your chances of success with the creation, general acceptance in the fancy, and then recognition of your new varieties are very slim. One needs to be involved with exhibiting a breed, and know it well, before one can hope to reproduce it, in the same quality as those currently exhibited, in a new variety.
     
  5. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Quote:It's not quite so dramatic. It's actually a rather simple, straightforward process. The main two considerations are that the breed or variety breed true, with QUALITY representatives which display a close resemblance to the standard, and there need be enough serious exhibitors to make it worth the effort and expense to recognize the new creation. Yes, there is expense involved, and breeders need to be seriously committed to establishing the new breed or variety. The governing organizations are not going to take seriously a lone breeder who claims to have created a new breed or variety, simply by crossbreeding over a few generations. In Sebrights, you already have the buff laced, which exists, in quantity and quailty, yet still has not created enough of a following to justify that it even be presented for recognition. What makes you think that your new creation will surpass those in quality and quantity, even in your lifetime, to qualify for recognition, when the buffs still have not?

    For the rules on how to present a new breed or variety for recognition, one only need to join the governing bodies of the fancy, the American Poultry Association and the American Bantam Association. The rules are clearly explained in each yearbook. I suggest that if you haven't yet demonstrated the dedication even to that level of becoming involved in the process, your chances of success with the creation, general acceptance in the fancy, and then recognition of your new varieties are very slim. One needs to be involved with exhibiting a breed, and know it well, before one can hope to reproduce it, in the same quality as those currently exhibited, in a new variety.

    Professional, why are you so catty? There is nothing in the original post to indicate that she is not a serious exhibitor or breeder, or that she is not a member of the ABA and/or ABA. It is possible that she is someone new to chickens (although that is not stated either), and in that case she should be encouraged, not discouraged. In any case, a lecture on why her question is inappropriate and her qualifications are insufficient is at best mean-spirited.

    I get the ABA yearbook and while I skim through the entire book and read (in detail) a great deal of it, I don't recall seeing the requirements for recognition of a new breed or variety. It may well be there, but I might well ask the question myself if I wasn't already aware of some of the criteria based upon breed club discussions and reading the minutes of the ABA board meetings (standards committee section).

    The ABA requires five years of breeding by at least five breeders, a qualifying meet at an ABA semi-annual with a minimum of (I don't recall the number) representative samples of each class. The APA process is similar, but not identical. Most times qualifying meets are held at joint APA/ABA semi-annuals to try for recognition by both organizations at the same time.

    Good luck with your efforts, That-Crazy-Lady [​IMG]
     
  6. amazondoc

    amazondoc Cracked Egghead

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    I dunno the process for ABA acceptance, but here's the general steps for APA recognition. I'll probably forget something, but this will give you the basic idea:

    1. Five breeders must sign affidavits attesting that they have each bred that particular variety for at least five years.
    2. You must pay a fee to the APA. This fee used to be $50, but it has gone way up. I *think* the fee is now $250, but I could easily be wrong about that.
    3. You must show at least two cocks, two cockerels, two hens, and two pullets in at least two shows per year, for at least two years. That is, 8 birds matching those sex/age requirements have to be present at EACH of those shows.
    4. You must write a standard and have it approved by the standards committee of the APA.
    5. AFTER you do all of these things, then you have a qualifying meet. At that qualifying meet, you must enter at least 50 birds. At least 4 breeders must each enter at least 1 cock, 1 cockerel, 1 hen, and 1 pullet EACH. The rest of the 50 birds can be any combination of sex and age, and be from any combination of breeders.
    6. At the qualifying meet, the APA board will vote on whether to approve that variety or not.

    This same basic process must be followed whether you are seeking recognition for a whole new breed, or just for a new variety within an already accepted breed. There are some diferences, however, if you have a bantam breed and variety that is already ABA recognized, and you simply want to add APA recognition.

    In general -- it's a lot of work!
     
  7. Professional

    Professional Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:It's not quite so dramatic. It's actually a rather simple, straightforward process. The main two considerations are that the breed or variety breed true, with QUALITY representatives which display a close resemblance to the standard, and there need be enough serious exhibitors to make it worth the effort and expense to recognize the new creation. Yes, there is expense involved, and breeders need to be seriously committed to establishing the new breed or variety. The governing organizations are not going to take seriously a lone breeder who claims to have created a new breed or variety, simply by crossbreeding over a few generations. In Sebrights, you already have the buff laced, which exists, in quantity and quailty, yet still has not created enough of a following to justify that it even be presented for recognition. What makes you think that your new creation will surpass those in quality and quantity, even in your lifetime, to qualify for recognition, when the buffs still have not?

    For the rules on how to present a new breed or variety for recognition, one only need to join the governing bodies of the fancy, the American Poultry Association and the American Bantam Association. The rules are clearly explained in each yearbook. I suggest that if you haven't yet demonstrated the dedication even to that level of becoming involved in the process, your chances of success with the creation, general acceptance in the fancy, and then recognition of your new varieties are very slim. One needs to be involved with exhibiting a breed, and know it well, before one can hope to reproduce it, in the same quality as those currently exhibited, in a new variety.

    Professional, why are you so catty? There is nothing in the original post to indicate that she is not a serious exhibitor or breeder, or that she is not a member of the ABA and/or ABA. It is possible that she is someone new to chickens (although that is not stated either), and in that case she should be encouraged, not discouraged. In any case, a lecture on why her question is inappropriate and her qualifications are insufficient is at best mean-spirited.

    I get the ABA yearbook and while I skim through the entire book and read (in detail) a great deal of it, I don't recall seeing the requirements for recognition of a new breed or variety. It may well be there, but I might well ask the question myself if I wasn't already aware of some of the criteria based upon breed club discussions and reading the minutes of the ABA board meetings (standards committee section).

    The ABA requires five years of breeding by at least five breeders, a qualifying meet at an ABA semi-annual with a minimum of (I don't recall the number) representative samples of each class. The APA process is similar, but not identical. Most times qualifying meets are held at joint APA/ABA semi-annuals to try for recognition by both organizations at the same time.

    Good luck with your efforts, That-Crazy-Lady [​IMG]

    Oh, my dear, no. You seem to have a knack for misconstruing my comments and misinterpreting my intent. True, there is a lot unstated in the original post. By simple deduction I presumed that the poster was not an APA or an ABA member, for if she was, in my mind she would have no need to ask the question, as the information was readily available to her. Now, I think it's safe to say that she is not illiterate, due to her post here, so she could have easily read it if she had it in her possession. Until now I hadn't thought of the possibility of her just being lazy and not bothering to look at the information which the organizations had provided her. Such a supposition may have indeed been taken as being catty. I suppose, like you, one could have the information yet fail to read it, instead looking for someone to provide an abridged version. If that's the case, not familiarizing oneself with the actual rules seems to me a way to jump into a project without being fully informed. Not my idea of the dedication needed to be able to follow through with creating two new varieties and then getting them recognized. In today's world of instant gratification, there are many who simply do not understand what is truly involved in creating a new breed or variety, nor the simple yet prolonged process in getting one recognized. To help answer the question, I felt that a responsible answer must include preparing one for the road which lies ahead, rather than just regurgitating some of the highlights, and sending them off with a pat on the back and a smilie face. If I felt the question to be inappropriate, and many are, I would have ignored it, and not offered the benefit of my experience. The mean spirt here is twisting a helpful intent into an insult, an intent which in no way suggests that anyone's qualifications are insufficient. They may be, or not. That is for the OP to decide. My outline of some of the qualifications needed to see the process through to fruition may help the poster to determine for herself if she does indeed have what it takes, or not, to get the job done. How is that unhelpful? I suggest that it's infinitely more helpful than you doing some of the work for her.
     
  8. that_crazy_lady

    that_crazy_lady Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sonoran - thank you, that was very kind

    and thank you all for the info.

    I am new to the show/breeding world of chicken, but there is no shame in that. and I'm starting with a plan. I am not yet a member, I do not have my Sebrights or the OGEBs that I will be useing for the color yet. I've only had my LF for 4 months now.

    this was un-called for to say the least.
    What makes you think that your new creation will surpass those in quality and quantity, even in your lifetime, to qualify for recognition, when the buffs still have not?​
     
  9. Professional

    Professional Chillin' With My Peeps

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    this was un-called for to say the least.


    What makes you think that your new creation will surpass those in quality and quantity, even in your lifetime, to qualify for recognition, when the buffs still have not?

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Once you have begun to put your plan into actual practice, you will see that the question was meant to start to give you tools for you to use to help give an honest self assessment of your new creations. It wasn't questioning your dream for where you want these birds to be when you're done with them. Think again, if you don't plan to have the APA, ABA, judges and other exhibitors give their harsh opinions of whether your birds will surpass the quality and quantity of already successful, extant varieties which still don't meet the quailfications for entry into the standards.

    BTW, just about every new exhibitor has a dream of being the creator of the next exciting breed or variety. Good luck to you, but seldom does it work out. We can probably count on one hand the number of individual breeders who have created new varieties within a breed. All have had years of breeding experience before they attempted it, and years more before they came anywhere close to perfecting it.​
     
  10. Ladyhawke1

    Ladyhawke1 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Personally, I just point and yell...OH LOOK! Purple! [​IMG]
     
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