How do you introduce a new larger quantity to a (much) lesser?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by RENEatlChickens, Sep 6, 2014.

  1. RENEatlChickens

    RENEatlChickens New Egg

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    Hi, I am new so I hope I am not reposting this, and also that it fits appropriately in this forum. A few days ago 3 of my 4 chickens were attacked in the yard by a pack of coyotes in the morning. I have one Andalusian left. (My beautiful Spitzhauben that died is my icon) The Andalusian is perfectly fine and laying other than seeming a little depressed.[​IMG]

    Tomorrow I am going to buy 2 Oliver Eggers, and probably a couple Easter Eggers from the same flock who are approx. her age and laying. I know quarantine is highly recommended if not mandatory, but I don’t really know how to go about this since she is the only one.

    I feel wrong to separate her from her home, and would also feel wrong not giving them the appropriate space.

    I need some advice. Thank you!
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2014
  2. Yorkshire Coop

    Yorkshire Coop Moderator Staff Member

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  3. Den in Penn

    Den in Penn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Welcome to BYC.
    Since you are getting them from the same place and have only one other I would not bother with a strict quarantine. The best way to introduce them is to have them separated in pens in their area for a week so they can get to know each other. Then let them free to physically interact with each other. Have the two new breeds you are thinking of been raised together?
     
  4. RENEatlChickens

    RENEatlChickens New Egg

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    Yes they have, I believe they're sisters
     
  5. RENEatlChickens

    RENEatlChickens New Egg

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    Thanks!
     
  6. Den in Penn

    Den in Penn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If the Andalusian was also part of the group it should go much better then complete strangers. But you never know with any living thing.
     
  7. Mrs. K

    Mrs. K Overrun With Chickens

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    With one bird, you don't have a flock, the flock is the group of birds that you are introducing. There is a risk when you mix birds, but the coyotes is a bigger risk! Ugh I get tired of predators.

    If they are the same size, I would just put everyone together. The single bird has the home front advantage, but being a single bird, it is not a big one. I would just add them at night, have some hide outs in the run, some extra feed stations and call it good.

    Mrs K
     
  8. RENEatlChickens

    RENEatlChickens New Egg

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    I did that Mrs. K, and it seems to definitely be working. Putting them in around dusk helped, too I think. I also put in treats scattered around to distract and a lot of straw to scratch at. There were a couple brawls but otherwise it seems that the pecking order is being established fast.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. chknseverywhere

    chknseverywhere New Egg

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    What should i do if one chicken is a smaller breed than the rest? Can i still introduce them? Also when i tried with other chickens they tend to fight and kick each other. Is this normal? Am i suppose to let them fight? Im worried they might get hurt :( thanks mrs k!
     
  10. Mrs. K

    Mrs. K Overrun With Chickens

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    A smaller bird can be at a disadvantage. However, if she already 'belongs' to the group being introduced, it might work. If it doesn't work, and you have space, you can separate her with a 'friend'. Let that friendship get firmly established and then introduce the pair. Size is a major indicator of trouble with integrations.

    Mrs K
     

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