How do you know for sure that they are selling you a female chick?

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by mama2chickies, May 18, 2010.

  1. mama2chickies

    mama2chickies Out Of The Brooder

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    I am learning lots thanks to all of you! My husband stopped by the feed store and picked us up 2 barred rock, and 2 silver laced wyandotte. We want eggs and had previously bought 8 straight run from a different feed store. He wanted to make sure we would have some hens. The store only sells female unless it is Easter. At such a young age how do they know for sure that it is a female? And what do they do with all the roosters?
     
  2. cackler

    cackler Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG] I'd like to know as well. We bought 10 'pullets' in April. Looks like one's a rooster for SURE. Not sure what we'll do with him. [​IMG] I wish it was more accurate......
     
  3. HeatherLynn

    HeatherLynn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I don't believe any of them. I bought pullets from the feed store. Purchased 8. 3 of them turned out to be pullets. The rest of the little buggers are bumping chests, fighting and have huge bright red combs now.

    I bought 6 straight run and at least got 3 girlies and 3 boys. Better odds than I had with trying to just buy pullets. If you can find someone on here who is selling you probably would have a ton better luck than with the feed store.
     
  4. zDoc

    zDoc Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG]
     
  5. redhen

    redhen Kiss My Grits... Premium Member

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    You dont REALLY know.. unless they are sex-link chicks...
     
  6. suzyq53511

    suzyq53511 Drowning in Chickens!

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    I think it depends on how talented the sexer is....i believe it takes years to learn how to do this properly.
     
  7. cackler

    cackler Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It doesn't take a lot to move one from one tank to another, either. I am thinking this probably happens more often than not by kids, etc. When the store staff catch them for you to take home they just take whoever they can catch. I'm thinking next year that I'll catch who I want - that is if I can figure out who's male and who's female. [​IMG]
     
  8. Megs

    Megs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    hatcheries use the vent sexing method (they check inside the vent for a "bump" or no bump, i beleave the bump means male and is the early stages of the testicles), "dirty jobs" did an episode on it, i beleave at McMurray hatchery! worth a watch. vent sexing is not 100% accurate which is why hatcheries usually only guarantee 80-90% correct, they leave a 10-20% margin for error.

    very few breeds are feather sexable, and some are sex-linked for color.

    so in short, unless its sex linked, or you know the breed can be feather sexed (and then they have to be day olds, or the feathers grow and it is no longer accurate), there is no sure way to tell. you just have to hope the feed store employees label the chicks correctly and none bin jump.
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2010
  9. cackler

    cackler Chillin' With My Peeps

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    How is it that sex link chicks are easier to sex? I have 3 red sexlinks......they are pullets for sure but not sure how that is detected when they are little bits.
     
  10. Megs

    Megs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    sex-linking refers to males and females of the same type being different colors upon hatching, some breeds its as small as the male has a white dot on the black plumage, whereas the females are all black. i dont know much about sex-linkage, so i cant state an example of a sex-linked breed.
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2010

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