how do you make a rooster friendly to another rooster

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by chickenman98, Apr 3, 2011.

  1. chickenman98

    chickenman98 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    how do you make a rooster stop chasing another rooster while the rooster being chased tries to breed the hens?
     
  2. wolftracks

    wolftracks Spam Hunter

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    If the other is chasing him he is the alpha roo. There's a pecking order. The top roo doesn't let the others step on his toes. If they get along otherwise, then they do get along.
     
  3. teach1rusl

    teach1rusl Love My Chickens

    You get rid of a rooster [​IMG] Seriously, an alpha doesn't want anyone else breeding his girls.
    Or you could give each rooster his own run/flock of girls....
    Or confine one rooster while the other runs with the girls...
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2011
  4. chickenman98

    chickenman98 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Will their attitude toward one another get better over time?
     
  5. wolftracks

    wolftracks Spam Hunter

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    Quote:Probably, but you may have to separate if it doesn't.

    What breed are they? That matters.
     
  6. teach1rusl

    teach1rusl Love My Chickens

    Quote:Personally, I doubt it. Many have roosters that DO get along fairly well, usually because they have a large enough flock, a huge run (or free ranging), and just the personalities of the roosters (which would be a key factor). But many roosters won't tolerate another rooster, no matter how large the flock. In this case, the roosters would have to be housed separately. Since your alpha seems to be very intolerant of the other, I just can't see him giving in on his own.
     
  7. bburn

    bburn Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 9, 2010
    Delaware, Arkansas
    We had way too many roos and got rid of all but three.

    Then the BO beat up the BR and so the BR got his own digs. Then the LF Cochin stepped up to the plate and he got beat up and then he got his own corner where is was pitifully lonely and I got him some girls.

    So, now I have a mixed flock. I have a BR flock and a very small Cochin flock that I am working on increasing.

    I really think it only gets worse and they need to be separated. Sadly.
     
  8. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    It's all about dominance, assuring that his genes get passed on and the pecking order. This is how chickens/roosters conduct their lives. Peaceful coexistence is variable and generally depends upon the breed, personality and how the roosters have been raised. Most roosters will not accept a "new" rooster into the flock but may tolerate one that they were raised with.
     
  9. Miss Lydia

    Miss Lydia Running over with Blessings Premium Member

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    agree with sourland, I have 2 roos and 20 hens they coexist very well together. son gives father wide birth, then I'll see father leading girls out of the fence to free range and son bringing up the rear. If I had more roos there would be utter caios, too many roos spoil the peaceful existance of the flock.
     
  10. Jferlisi

    Jferlisi i dont eat chicken!!!!

    Nov 2, 2010
    Menifee CA
    It all depends on the roos, I had two that where great together, they where raised together, one was a BO and the other was a SLW. So it depends on them.
     

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