How do you raise chicks outside from day one?

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by Scooter&Suzie, Oct 17, 2011.

  1. Scooter&Suzie

    Scooter&Suzie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I tried looking this up on Google, and on here, but I couldn't find what I was looking for. In the spring I was thinking of raising chicks. I already raised two batches of chicks. I kept them both inside for several weeks, two, or three maybe, then my mom said, out they go, 'cause they were real smelly. You see we don't have a basement, so the smell really stinks in the whole first floor. Last time I had chicks inside my mom said it was the last time. I had to clean out the chicks cage everyday, sometimes every other day though, and they still stunk really bad. So they went outside, into our shed, which was pretty warm outside anyway. This time my mom said the chicks can't start inside. They have to be outside. So they either need to be kept in a coop, or a shed, with a brooder lamp, which we have.

    My friends a couple minutes down the street said every time they raised chicks outside they got something... Bloody Stool I think it was called. It came from wild birds droppings. They now keep their chicks inside in their basement until 8 weeks. I can't even keep mine in for one week! I really want to get more chicks in the spring... but how can I do it? Can you tell me a medication to give my chicks so they don't get bloody stool, or some way to prevent it? Also please give me any information on how to raise them outside you can.

    Thanks,
    Rachel
     
  2. NorthestGeorgia14

    NorthestGeorgia14 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The mommy do everthing the mommy will take care of her babies
     
  3. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    99.9 percent of chicks are not brooded in someone's house!!!! The industry broods in barn, farmers brood in barns, oh, wait.... I brood in the barn!!! [​IMG][​IMG]

    Of course you can brood in a garage, a shed, a coop or a barn. As long as you can meet the temperatures required, which isn't hard to do, why would it be difficult? No way I brood inside the house. I'd be in the doghouse or sleeping in the barn, which isn't going to happen.
     
  4. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    Cocci is the disease you are likely referring to. Cocci can be blocked and kept from overwhelming the immune system of the chicks simply by feeding cocci-blocker chick start. It's call "medicated" chick starter. That's all it is. Most folks feed it. A simple and effective cocci blocker. After 10 weeks, most folks stop feeding it because the chicks, if exposed to the dirt, will now have strong enough immunity.
     
  5. debid

    debid Overrun With Chickens

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    Bloody poop is probably referring to coccidiosis. Cocci are present in soil so if you start chicks with access to soil (particularly soil that has been used for chicken raising before), your chicks can have their systems overwhelmed before they're old enough to develop resistance. There are medicated feed options that help control the cocci if this is a problem in your area.
     
  6. rcentner

    rcentner Chillin' With My Peeps

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    who says you can't put a heat lamp in the coop/shed or whatever. I have never raised chicks inside, I prefer to have mama hens do the job of keeping the little ones warm, but I have had chicks in early spring with no mama. Put a heat lamp out so they could huddle underneath it if they were cold, worked great.
     
  7. debid

    debid Overrun With Chickens

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    FWIW, I used a wooden box with a hardware cloth lid on my back porch for a brooder. It worked GREAT, I could still see the chicks easily, and no smell in the house.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2011
  8. Scooter&Suzie

    Scooter&Suzie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I like that idea. We have a screened in porch, raccoons can probably get in though, but I just will have to raccoon proof it! I can then stick it by my window... and TADA!

    Lots of these are great ideas! I don't have any mommy hens, unless my silkies would adopt the chicks as their own, which I don't think they will, since right now they are about 11, maybe 12 weeks old, and have never raised their own chicks.

    So will my chick starter feed form TSC (Tractor Supply Co.) keep the chicks healthy from that Cocci sickness? It doesn't say it is medicated, but it is the only chick feed I can find to buy in my area.

    Thanks for all the quick answers,
    Rachel
     
  9. debid

    debid Overrun With Chickens

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    I hinged the lid in back and put two little latches on the front. I didn't want the raccoons getting in it either!

    OH, and the best part about all of this was that my porch isn't screened so the bugs came in hordes and the chicks chased them around and stuffed themselves with insect protein all night. They had the shiniest feathers!

    ETA: I didn't use medicated feed. I used a nipple waterer to keep the brooder nice and dry and gave them only limited access to soil to develop their immunity gradually. It worked for me.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2011
  10. Chook Love

    Chook Love New Egg

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    I'm currently brooding on the screen porch and have successfully done it in the past. I just suspend a brooder lamp for the first few weeks and during the evenings of several weeks (I'm in FL so it's pretty temperate). If I were brooding over winter, I'd use the lamp a little more. [​IMG]
     

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