How do you raise Seramas outside in coldish climates? (Such as Pennsylvania)

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by Scooter&Suzie, Mar 4, 2012.

  1. Scooter&Suzie

    Scooter&Suzie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 23, 2011
    Pennsylvania
    I live in Pennsylvania, and was thinking about getting two Serama hens. I heard that they do not cope well with cold and that their living area must be 60F or above. Keeping them inside is not a choice, so my only option is for them to live outside or not get them at all. I would be keeping them in a rabbit hutch; I hope to build a run that will go on the ground so they can scratch and do all that fun stuff. I'm really not sure about heating the hutch, since I think it would all just go out through the door. Where I live it tends not to go below 20, but it is possible. I may be able to give them a lamp on colder days, and confine them inside their hutch... I donno.

    I will go out now to get a picture of the hutch, so you guys have an idea what I am working with.
     
  2. Scooter&Suzie

    Scooter&Suzie Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,505
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    Jun 23, 2011
    Pennsylvania
    In this picture you can see the sleeping area (left) and the outside area (right). My hope is to add on a ramp - leading to a run - for them, so they have some grass.
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    This is the back of the sleep area, it gives you an idea of how wide it is. I was told by a friend that this would fit 2 bantams. He has had chickens for over 15 years, shows them, and all that good stuff. He totally knows what he is talking about. And no, "my friend" isn't a shop keeper trying to get me to buy his chickens.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2012
  3. diornisextant

    diornisextant Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 26, 2011
    i have had my seramas out in weather while i was gone from the house and came home to snow and ice and left them out at night once when it froze over night with no ill effects . I have been told they can manage 20 degrees but I worry about the combs at that point. I have vaselined the combs if i thought it might get cold and haven't seen any frostbite.
    They have a high perch under a cover so I think that keeps frost from forming. I am in the rocess of building a coop with an insulated hutch for them a raised floor in part and a double "pane" sky light so they have a protected spot to retire to with a window for light . The hope is that when/if it gets cold they will retire to the upstairs and the sun coming in through the sky light will warm the area enought to keep them from frostbite in the winter .
    It raerely snows here so I think it can work. I feed high calorie foods in the winter too to help them keep fat and will breed for hardiness.I may end up placing a heat lamp in with them if it gets too cold though.
     

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