How do you sex or tell the differecnce in Male and Female Guinea Fowl?

Discussion in 'Guinea Fowl' started by texascowboy1979, Jan 16, 2011.

  1. texascowboy1979

    texascowboy1979 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Ive got a few Guinea Fowl. The only reason I had chicks born last year is because I took the eggs from my hen and put them under a chicken. Well, Ive had a bobcat problem that looks to be solved, but I need to pen up 1 male and all the female guinea fowl, but I dont know who the boy or girls are. Can the horn tell you the difference?

    Ive got 1 Blue, 2 white, and about 5 pied/pearl .

    Please post pictures. thanks for your help.
     
  2. SilverPhoenix

    SilverPhoenix Bantam Fanatic

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    It's a bit subtle, really. One of the most distinct things is that only the females make the "Buck-wheat, buck-wheat, buck-wheat!" sounding cry. The males also have a larger horn/helmet and wattles. My male likes to charge at things he finds threatening, too.

    I hope that helps! It's not as easy as with chickens, but if you watch carefully and observe, you can certainly tell them apart.
     
  3. Cowgirl71

    Cowgirl71 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It can be REALLY hard to sex Guineas. You cannot accurately sex them by pictures.

    The best way is to listen. A female's call will sound like this: Males CANNOT make this sound.

    EITHER GENDER can make this call, but usually only the males: (you can hear the female call in the background occasionally)

    The males will also often prance, with their wings held up, and race at other birds (not a reliable indicator, just something I've noticed).

    Another way I've heard of but never tried is to wait until laying season, and measure the distance between their pin bones, just like you would with chickens. It would tell you which are laying hens, and which were roosters and non-laying hens.

    I have 15 Guineas, BTW. Seven males and eight females, Pearl, Pearl Pied, Lavendar Pied, White, and Royal Purple. I'm planning to hatch some more this year and boost the flock size to 25+. [​IMG]
     
  4. BlakesFarm

    BlakesFarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    the most common way to sex guinea fowl is by there sound...Most females will go buck-weat buck-weat alot (and for no reason), and the males will only speak on an alarm call (like chi-chi-chi).

    Female sound:


    Male sound:



    EDIT: Cowgirl71, you posted a min before me! [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2011
    1 person likes this.
  5. texascowboy1979

    texascowboy1979 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Thanks... ill see if I can figure it out by sounds. I need to lock them up before Feb... All my guineas are from last years hatch. My hens that laid them last year dissapeard to lay in the woods, and never came back. The bobcat probly got them like they got the chickens and turkeys last year. My hens of all breeds love to brood in the woods, but its not safe.
     
  6. santana farm

    santana farm Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks for the tips this should help me with my new flock of 16. They are only 4 weeks old now. Caint wait till they ate out an about.
     
  7. Well, I can confirm we have both boys and girls. :gig
     
  8. New Guinea Farm

    New Guinea Farm New Egg

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    Anyone have any advice on what kind of pen will keep them safe and happy? I just acquired two keets and live in an area where there are owls, foxes, and other animals that pose a threat to the little keets.
     
  9. BusyBearMama

    BusyBearMama Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I believe 1 - the females make a sound the makes cannot and they also lay eggs... So you basically have to stalk adult birds until you observe things then tag them or something?
     
  10. bcfd2004

    bcfd2004 Out Of The Brooder

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    As usual the females make most of the noise. They never seem to shut up, so if you watch them for any length of time you should be able to tell.
     

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