How does this combination of breeds sound?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by J. Ruth, Nov 27, 2011.

  1. J. Ruth

    J. Ruth Out Of The Brooder

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    I was thinking about keeping a combination of Sussex, Wyandottes, Orpingtons, and Wellsummers. I would only be keeping them for meat and eggs. But, I hope to replace them without ordering more chicks from hatcheries. I was also planning to house them all together. I was wondering if there were any specific disadvantages of keeping this combination of breeds. I was also wondering if there would be any breeding disadvantages because they would most likely be cross-breeding. Thank you. I would appreciate any advice. [​IMG]
     
  2. so lucky

    so lucky Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think people keep all kinds of chickens together. They normally get along fine, as long as you give them a coop that is big enough, and there is not a great difference in their ages. I don't know about cross breeding them, but it will probably be ok as long as you are not trying to sell them as a particular breed. It won't make any difference in the quality of the eggs, for eating. This site has a wealth of good information, yours for the taking. Use the search function--the google custom search function in the upper right-hand area, to researach any chicken related topic. Have fun, and [​IMG]
     
  3. crazyhen

    crazyhen Overrun With Chickens

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    Be sure the roo you choose is one that is not to big for your smaller hens. I had that problem once. If you keep two roos you could have two seperate pens that join but are devided. Gloria Jean
     
  4. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    That will make a nice mixed flock, and the offspring will be pretty and great layers, too. Hatchery stock may be a bit light for a good meat bird, it just depends on your expectations.
     
  5. J. Ruth

    J. Ruth Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you! I appreciate the advice. [​IMG]
     
  6. fowlsessed

    fowlsessed Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You will get good hybrid vigor in the crosses, and better egg production.
     
  7. kari_dawn

    kari_dawn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I think OP will be okay, I think those are dual purpose breeds, though I do not know about welsummers...of the only two I ever had, one died before it reached 1 week, and the other turned out to be a rooster.

    To me, that sounds like it would be a beautiful mix of birds. All of those breeds are birds that are right up my alley. I have a speckled sussex, and she is quite a character. I also have wyandottes and orpingtons, both of which I LOVE. Sounds like a GREAT flock mix to me! I don't think there would be any disadvantages of keeping a mixed flock of those breeds. I have three of the four breeds you mentioned in my flock currently, and they do wonderful together.
     
  8. anderson8505

    anderson8505 Peace, Love & Happy Chickens

    J. Ruth :

    I was thinking about keeping a combination of Sussex, Wyandottes, Orpingtons, and Wellsummers. I would only be keeping them for meat and eggs. But, I hope to replace them without ordering more chicks from hatcheries. I was also planning to house them all together. I was wondering if there were any specific disadvantages of keeping this combination of breeds. I was also wondering if there would be any breeding disadvantages because they would most likely be cross-breeding. Thank you. I would appreciate any advice. [​IMG]

    Differing breeds do fine IF they are raised together from (preferably) young chicks. I've tried mixing in Speckled Sussexes as adults with my BR & PR and the BR HATE them, only have one left now. I have to deliver her to the coop every night.

    As far as breeding, as long as you are prepared to deal with chicken mutts, wanted or unwanted, there isn't much else to worry about. Death genes I guess, but I don't know much about those.​
     

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