How is it possible? Talking about Cornish X

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by M To The Maxx, Jan 25, 2010.

  1. M To The Maxx

    M To The Maxx Baseball+Girls=Life

    Jul 24, 2009
    Lutz,FL
    How is it possible that there are so many Cornish? I thought they live a short life and the hens are not very good layers. How do the hens stay alive for so long when they have a short life span to have chicks? Please explain. Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2010
  2. TimG

    TimG Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 23, 2008
    Maine
    I think you are confusing Cornish Crosses and just plain Cornish.
     
  3. Ariel301

    Ariel301 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 14, 2009
    Kingman Arizona
    Regular cornish live the same lifespan as any other chicken. The cornish cross doesn't make it often to reproducing age because of its size, but you don't get cornish cross by crossing one cornish cross to another, it's a special genetic 'recipe' of regular cornish and plymouth rock matings.
     
  4. karabbitry

    karabbitry Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 4, 2009
    Quote:It is actually more than even just a cornish crossed with a rock. The initial cross was done years and years ago. Now you have a "breed" and I use that term loosly. But when I was finishing up my bachelors degree last year I did a study on hatchability of cornish cross breeders. We ran a flock of about 100 parent stock breeders for the terminal cornish cross meat chickens. These birds did not live to be that old...up to a year old but this generation still lays well (at least moderately). They were also on a very strict diet and all 100 breeders were weighed every 3 weeks and their diets were adjusted accordingly. This was to improve longevity on the breeders. The parent generation to the terminal broilers are very expensive birds to buy if you are able to obtain them. We were able to because it was for research purposes...other than that they don't let out their genetics normally. This is why we monitored their weights so close
     
  5. Ariel301

    Ariel301 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 14, 2009
    Kingman Arizona
    What I mean is that those two breeds were the ones used to create the end result, the cornish cross. I know that way more goes into it than just mate a cornish with a plymouth rock, otherwise we'd all be doing it at home!
     
  6. nzpouter

    nzpouter Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 19, 2009
    new zealand
    Quote:Do you have a pic of how the parent birds looks like?
     
  7. Goose and Fig

    Goose and Fig Grateful Geese

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    Apr 19, 2009
    Fall Creek Falls TN
    Are Dark Cornish smaller than other ones? Mine is 2 years old, lays pretty well, and actually looks better than she did at 1 year old. She's even gone broody on me. [​IMG]
     
  8. Bantimna

    Bantimna Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 29, 2009
    South Africa
    Quote:Thats weird normally they don't go broody and are not good-layers [​IMG]
     
  9. Goose and Fig

    Goose and Fig Grateful Geese

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    Apr 19, 2009
    Fall Creek Falls TN
    Quote:Thats weird normally they don't go broody and are not good-layers [​IMG]

    Aren't Dark Cornish and Indian Game the same thing? I thought game hens were good broodies & mothers. Well- anyway- mine is [​IMG]
     
  10. dancingbear

    dancingbear Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 2, 2008
    South Central KY
    Quote:Thats weird normally they don't go broody and are not good-layers [​IMG]

    You may have them confused with another breed. Standard Cornish aren't great layers, but often they lay reasonably well, for the first couple of years, anyway. But they are well known for being very broody. My best brooders are a pair of dark Cornish hens, and some light Brahma hens. All LF, no bantams.
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2010

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