How is the best way to add a rooster and how to know what to add?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by harleyjo, Jun 25, 2010.

  1. harleyjo

    harleyjo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We have been offered a rooster that is from last years hatch. I have BSL and either a barred rock or australorp. They are 6 and 9 weeks old. In another thread I started the one person that answered sad it is not a good idea to add one that old with all the youngsters.

    So how is the best way to do it? Do I look for a roo around the same age? I only want one so if I have to isolate him he would be alone.

    I also want to know what crosses produce what. I will keep rotating my flock every 18 months to 2 years. I will be keeping heavy breed brown egg layers. I live in a cold winter climate.

    So can someone give me some guidance as to what would be the breeds to have with what. I hope this is making sense. Now since I have black colored birds I will get lighter colored or more laced or barred chicks next spring so I will try to keep alternating some.

    IF someone can figure out what I am trying to ask I would appreciate some help here. I would love to have some few chicks now and then.
     
  2. harleyjo

    harleyjo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Any opinions anyone?
     
  3. jeremy

    jeremy CA Royal Blues

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    Age is a determining factor, yes, when adding new birds to your flock. However you should never forget about the size of the new bird coming into your existing flock. If said bird is much smaller, it may get picked on by your girls or on the opposite side of the equation if the bird is much larger it may very well bully your other chickens. No matter what the age.

    Don't forget to quarantine the new bird either before you add it into your flock!

    ETA: If I were you I would get a rooster that's the same breed as my hens. You can sell fertile hatching eggs that way, most folks won't pay a dime for mixed breed chickens. Australorps are said to be very gentle.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2010
  4. Lollipop

    Lollipop Chillin' With My Peeps

  5. harleyjo

    harleyjo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I guess I am not fully understanding how you do this then. I know that black sex links are created by crosses. I also know though from reading in my book of Raising Chickens that you can't take a BSL male and breed it with a BSL female and end up with a BSL. I guess I am just trying to create some kind of a plan to know how to get the most out of my back yard flock.
     
  6. Lollipop

    Lollipop Chillin' With My Peeps

    harleyjo, please be specific with your questions. The first question was concerning adding a rooster to your sexlink pullets, but other posts have not made much sense. It is a fact that hybrids do not reproduce like kind, so is the offered rooster a BS or something else? Why are you keeping chickens. Is it primarily for eggs, or a hobby, or something else? I don`t understand why you need to rotate your flock every 18 months. That only gives you about a year of egg production from each group. Help me understand what you want to know..........Pop
     
  7. harleyjo

    harleyjo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I honestly can't tell you what the rooster is? She has all the breeds together and they have a whole barn to run around in. It was dark colored but had reddish brown in it too. I think from all the reading we have done we have pretty much decided against getting this rooster right now. I don't have a good place to separate it for a month and I am concerned about the pullets getting hurt by it. It is a big rooster.

    I am sorry I haven't made sense. We primarily want good egg production for eating and selling eggs. I am just getting started in this so please be patient with me. The more I learn the more I want to do more things. Oh and the deal with the 18 months to 2 years is to keep hens around during the prime of their egg production. I have talked to many people that have said they rotate, cull and sell every few years for this reason. Whether I end up doing that too I really don't know yet. I am not there yet.

    I wouldn't mind getting a backyard flock that I know that I can have good egg production but also if I get a broody from time to time could let her hatch some eggs so that I can sell the chicks. So I want to try to figure out what are good egg laying breeds that I can have together that will produce known breeds. I guess what I am trying to say is that right now I have BSL. They were cheap and an easy way for us to get our egg layers started. If I buy chicks next spring I want to figure out what are good breeds to buy say one rooster and then if it breeds with my hens that I would end up with something other than a back yard mix. I don't know how else to explain this.

    Like what makes a Barred Rock or a Black Sex Link?

    There are Buff Orpintons and I love them or the Wyndottes. I just don't understand enough about chicken breeding yet. So anyway if you don't follow me I will figure this out. For now I think the rooster is out. Thanks.
     
  8. Lollipop

    Lollipop Chillin' With My Peeps

    Hey, that`s better. Now I can see what you want. Starting with sexlinks is not a bad thing, it`s just that they won`t reproduce like kind. So, if you want purebred chickens, ya gotta start with regular breeds and not hybrids(crossbreeds like sexlinks). Barred rocks or Orpingtons, or Wyndottes are all considered breeds and will reproduce more of the same, as will many others. The choices are almost unlimited. If you want a breed that will go broody sometimes, most of the white egg layers won`t. If you want the best egg producers and still want broodies, try to stay away from breeds that are noted for their broodiness, but will still do it occasionally. You have plenty of time now to research the breeds that catch your eye. You should start with just one breed so you can get the hang of breeding. By the way, I love roosters for many reasons, but you don`t need a rooster with the flock you have, so enjoy them and get a rooster next time. Good luck .........Pop
     

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