How likely are coyotes inside a fenced yard during daytime?

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by mpghm, May 10, 2014.

  1. mpghm

    mpghm In the Brooder

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    We have a 6ft fence around the yard, it's in a suburban area, but faces a greenbelt. We know there are coyotes there, we often hear them at night, sometimes daytime too (they will howl when there is an ambulance/firetruck going by).

    Today we spotted a couple wandering around the street, and prompted some doubts about our chicken plans (poor timing as I just completed the coop and purchased feed and litter)

    I know chickens will attract coyotes, and I can protect the chickens against that (or just deal with any loss). Our main worry is that we could have coyotes coming into our yard while our 3 year old is out there (we would usually be in the yard, or monitoring from a window, but can't always be in close range), and be hurt by a hungry animal.

    How likely is this? What can be done to minimize the risk of animals inside the yard during the day?
     
  2. RiddleMe

    RiddleMe Songster

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    Do you have a dog? If not, you will want to do daily "perimeter patrols" to make sure you don't see any signs of their attempting to dig under your fence, especially if you have any plans of free ranging. Also, consider lining the interior of your fence with rocks, makes it so if they try to dig under, the rock will roll into the hole making it harder for them to succeed. Or of possible, run an electric fence wire near the top and bottom on the outside of your fence. I live in a slightly less populated situation, minimum lot size is 1 acre, mine is 5 1/2 with 6' perimeter fencing and 1 1/2 acres cross fenced as a dedicated free range area. While I had my dog, I never had a coyote attempt to come inside the fence line, but after he passed away, they dug under the perimeter fence twice and took birds while they were out free ranging. They picked areas to dig under that weren't in direct line of sight from the house but also weren't the farthest from the house. I lined a good portion of my fence with 6"-12" diameter rocks (started in the areas they were digging under then worked out from there as the muscles allowed) and also changed up my free range times, which seemed to resolve the issue. And we now have another dog and I haven't had any issues since. In the evenings, after the birds are locked up, I just let her roam the free range area, I'm sure they can smell her and it's probably not worth the possible fight when there is other prey in the area. We back up to BLM land so lots of wild rabbits and such for them to eat.
     
  3. centrarchid

    centrarchid Free Ranging

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    In an urban setting the coyotes will be coming from other than the green belt also. Fencing will not stop them, dog might as indicated. I would confine birds except when you are out with them and promptly drive off coyotes when they visit. If they are strongly habituated to humans then they may still hunt your birds under your nose. Then a dog would be reguired > 60 lbs that is also trained to be around chickens.
     
  4. I have never had problems form Coyotes fox bob-cats domestic animals yes and now I have a 6 foot fence all around the property but there was a time we had a 4 foot fence for many years and nerve a problem out of a coyote and yes they would stop and watch my geese for the longest amount of time ....
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2014
  5. If you get a dog be sure it is a serious dog then get two. Fufu dogs are coyote bait. Things like Australian shepherds when facing a pack of coyotes are just appetizers. Someone on local TV had a security cam in their back yard that recorded a lone coyote making off with their furry little fufu dog in under 30 seconds and yes they had a rear yard 6 foot privacy fence.
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2014
    1 person likes this.
  6. 4 the Birds

    4 the Birds Songster

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    A 6 ft high fence is a pretty nice perimeter fence! I would say that the odds of daytime predators are very low other than hawks. Night time is when predators are out and hunting. As mentioned, a big dog would be a huge deterrent of coyotes. We have many acres and a 4 ft high field fence at the perimeter and coyotes get in at night time now and then. They cry, howl and leave quickly once they get near the yard and detect our dogs housed near the chicken area (7 dogs live on the property). We have never had a coyote attack our chickens and they free range within an acre area. A few weeks ago a large raccoon was at our pond. It did not have much of a chance when the dogs found its scent.

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  7. RiddleMe

    RiddleMe Songster

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    Night time may be the norm but when I had my losses they actually occurred 8:30-9am the first time and mid day the second time. Based on time of year I think it was a case of hungry pups making them more brave than they might otherwise be. I'm sure of the time on the first one because my neighbors can see that part of my fence and saw them going under and carrying "something" away, 3 times. They said they thought they were just hunting rabbits on our property, if they had realized they were snagging chickens they would have done something...
     
  8. 4 the Birds

    4 the Birds Songster

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    Ah.. Good Point. We have had dogs dig a tunnel under fencing in less than an hour! I now have pavers along dog pen fencing. Not much can be done with free range fencing other than adding an electric line. We have had dogs jump and climb fencing within seconds when chasing a deer. Better fences are not fool proof but only increase your odds

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  9. 3riverschick

    3riverschick Poultry Lit Chaser

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    Hi,
    where do you live that makes a difference in how urbanized your coyotes are. In suburban San Diego county, they just walk along the tops of the fence boards, jump down into the yard, grab the small dog or cat, back up onto the fence board and off they go. One minute your dog or cat is playing, next minute, "poof!". Height of fence does not deter them. They use the fence boards (2x4)on the top rail of the fences as a highway. Most people do not leave their pets in the yard alone. Or they have a run to put them in which is roofed. You might try "predator pee" It's a neat product. http://www.predatorpee.com/
    They say their "Wolf Pee" is the one to use for coyotes.
    Best,
    Karen in western PA, USA
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2014
  10. johnderosa1

    johnderosa1 Songster

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    I also have a 3 year old that loves to be outside. I put a 7ft metal hex deer fence around the backyard area that houses my chickens but didnt think it was enough. We have lots of predators around here including coyotes and bears. I added a predator rated electric fence charger and two strands of wire. I feel pretty confident that all are safe with this setup.
     

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