How long after hatching does a broody stop being broody?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by annaraven, May 6, 2011.

  1. annaraven

    annaraven Born this way

    Apr 15, 2010
    SillyCon Valley
    So, my broody BO Buffy got to set on a clutch of eggs. They started hatching yesterday and are up to 7. Woot! My question is, since these eggs belonged to someone else, and they're planning on taking their chicks back, how long does she need to keep the chicks before she gets over being broody? I'm not sure they want her raising them until they're fully feathered out so I want to make sure we at least get her past being broody. If it were my choice, I'd just go with until they're fully feathered or "as long as possible" but I don't think that's what their owner would want. So what I need to know is the minimum, if anyone has a good idea of what that is.

    Thanks for any info.

    UPDATE:
    If it's 6 weeks or 2 months or whatever... that's more than "a couple days" like I was thinking. (oops.)

    Guess I'm gonna have to pick up a couple chicks at the local breeder and put them under her tomorrow night...

    So my next question: the chicks at the local breeder were born 5/3. My broody's chicks were born 5/5. Do you think she'll accept the new chicks okay as long as I put them under at night while there are still eggs under her that might hatch?

    Last edited by annaraven (Today 3:46 pm)
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2011
  2. pattgal

    pattgal Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 20, 2010
    New Brunswick, Canada
    Quote:2 months based on my experience with EE's
     
  3. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Sep 19, 2009
    Holts Summit, Missouri
    Termination of broodiness can be a function of many things. Keeping it simple, six weeks is minimum with my birds and some hens will brood for 12 weeks. Once chicks in full body feather, they can survive weaning. Prolonged care helps with keeping warm thus needing less food as well as predator protection. My chicks when weaned early are targeted by bird eating hawks. Just a little extra size makes a huge difference in respect to how hawk sizes you up for dinner. Until chicks big enough to be difficult for hawk to carry off, hen can be a decent protector so long as hawk most interested in chicks. Hen can survive weaning process at any age but will be stressed if early.
     
  4. annaraven

    annaraven Born this way

    Apr 15, 2010
    SillyCon Valley
    I'm not concerned about the chicks. The owner of the chicks has a brooder. (She also has other eggs that were in an incubator.) I'm mostly concerned about my broody hen.

    So six weeks or more? Seriously?

    Guess I'm gonna have to pick up a couple chicks at the local breeder and put them under her tomorrow night...

    ETA: The chicks at the local breeder were born 5/3. My broody's chicks were born 5/5. Do you think she'll accept the new chicks okay as long as I put them under at night while there are still eggs under her that might hatch?
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2011
  5. kano

    kano Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 24, 2008
    Santiago de Chile
    Quote:2 months based on my experience with EE's

    +2.
     

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