How long after "it" will a fertilized egg pop out?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by crait, Jul 10, 2008.

  1. crait

    crait Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 9, 2008
    Dallas, Texas
    Well, how long after "it" happens will a fertilized egg pop out?

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2008
  2. Wolf-Kim

    Wolf-Kim Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Breeding has nothing to do with egg-laying.

    Roosters will breed just about anything with feathers. One member had a rooster breed her glove.

    The hen will lay when she's ready.

    -Kim
     
  3. crait

    crait Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Tee hee!
    Sorry!
    I reworded it for better understanding.
     
  4. spatcher

    spatcher Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Virginia - Southside
    It? IT??? The most beautiful thing in the world and you call it "It?"...well according to Bill Clinton "it" depends on what "It" is! Seriously though, I have no clue!
     
  5. arlee453

    arlee453 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 13, 2007
    near Charlotte NC
    Hens lay approximately every 25 hours once they hit laying age. Then they will take a break for a day every so often and begin again.

    They do not need a rooster. They will lay just as often, as early and as well with or without a rooster to fertilize the eggs.

    If the hen is bred, then the hen stores up the sperm and each ova is fertilized as it leaves the ovary and before it is covered with the yolk, white and egg shell. A hen can lay fertile eggs up to several week after being bred to a rooster.

    And, it is the HEN that determines gender in chickens, not the male as in humans and other mammal species.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2008
  6. Solsken Farm

    Solsken Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:Okay this is informative! I had no idea roos were like energizer bunnies! Weeks, huh? That is amazing.
     
  7. crait

    crait Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Okay, thanks! Very, very informative!
    For the most part, we're going to eat our eggs whenever my two birds get older. But I was hoping to get a baby chick for my younger brother so he can get into chickens too! [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2008
  8. Beekissed

    Beekissed True BYC Addict

    Crait, I'm so glad you reworded your post....I was seriously worried about ya' for a moment. I read it earlier and knew I couldn't say anything that wouldn't be making fun of you, it was that funny!!! All I could picture was this hen in a maternity top, waddling around waiting for the big event! Sorry! Couldn't help it! [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  9. crait

    crait Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:It's no big deal. Usually, I have to edit posts I make about 6 or 7 times before I get it worded the way I want them. [​IMG]
     
  10. farmgirlie1031

    farmgirlie1031 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 26, 2008
    IA
    I've always heard 21 days but I don't know for sure. I know one hen I bought that had been in with a rooster I saved her eggs up for a couple weeks and got a few chicks to hatch from them. She may not have been fertile as long as 21 days because of the stress of moving but then again I'm not sure when she had actually last mated with the rooster either. I did not have her with a rooster until I had had her awhile as she was in quarantine being new to my place.
     

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