how long chicken survive without food

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by kriz the farmer, May 21, 2018.

  1. kriz the farmer

    kriz the farmer Songster

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    delhi
    hello guys please answer me fast

    i have a big question

    how long can a chicken survive without food
    well i will not my chick without food i want to know it if my homemade feed is not available then how long can they be hungry
     

  2. Tiana's chickens

    Tiana's chickens Songster

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    Growing chicks should really have food available at all times
     
  3. sawilliams

    sawilliams Songster

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    Depends on the age and if they freerange. I can't give you like a time line on it, but if they free range everyday but don't have a feeder full for a few hours maybe a day they should be ok. But i wouldn't go over a few hours of they can't free range. Becuase even though they will rush to the feeders once full free ranging (if there is plenty of grass and bugs) will provide enough to sustain them through the day. But it's not a complete feed, they can live strictly free ranging but the amount of eggs can decrease.
     
    Tiana's chickens likes this.
  4. kriz the farmer

    kriz the farmer Songster

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    delhi
    th
    thanks
     
  5. Aerliss

    Aerliss Songster

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    Tip for keeping a ready supply of food, even if you forget to order, or can't find any for a short period; keep a second tub or bag that you don't dip into except in emergencies.

    I do this with all sorts of things because I'm forgetful and sometimes have a mad schedule. It's best to have the extra be slightly lower quality, so you're not tempted to use it just because you're being lazy. So I have an emergency stash of hay for my rabbits that's not their favourite, shampoo that isn't great on my hair but does the job, tea and coffee that isn't so nice, toilet paper that's not so soft... and I keep a carton of UHT milk in the cupboard for emergencies. Came in handy when we had really bad snow that closed transport links for days.

    You just have to remember to check the dates now and then and use it up if it's getting close, then buy a new one. It takes a little bit of discipline, but is well worth it.
     
  6. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Crossing the Road

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    Only thing wrong with above post is that food looses nutrients after milling. A well published feed expert says that feed after 6 weeks is well on it's way towards becoming land fill.

    To OP: Chickens should never be without feed. (except at night when they are roosting.) Free range birds, depending on the range can find some feed. But don't except the typical uban house lot to provide any range of substance. If you ran out of feed, cook them some eggs, give them some grains from your pantry. Keep some whole grains on hand. Whole grains have a much longer shelf life than milled grains.
     
  7. Aerliss

    Aerliss Songster

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    In an emergency situation slightly less nutritious food is way better than no food at all.
     

  8. Spartan22

    Spartan22 Crowing

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    I always do have a new bag back up, just in case the store run out, my kids had emergencies which we do a lot, and my business travel that impulsively happens on a short notice. I agree about chickens should have feeds available all day long since they are grazers.
     
  9. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Crossing the Road

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    I time my trips (30 minute drive to feed store) so that I buy just enough feed to last 6 weeks. When I am down to my last bag, I plan my week so I can get more feed before running out. Yes, things happen to sometimes throw those plans out the window.

    My back up plan: I have some scratch grain on hand. Also, some whole grains. Always extra eggs on hand. If I ran out of feed, I could feed scratch and whole grains, some eggs, and perhaps clean out my fridge and freezer. My 4 acres of deliberately planted and varied land (grasses and weeds, both tall and short, woods, and heavily wood chip mulched orchard, deep litter in run, as well as sheet composting areas) also provide some of their daily sustenance.
     

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