How long do I have to wait for a green egg???

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Pharm Girl, Feb 9, 2011.

  1. Pharm Girl

    Pharm Girl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My EE stopped laying at the end of September/beginning of October. She started the molting process and has lost and regained every feather. She's huge and gorgeous and full of shiny new feathers, but still no eggs. She just turned 1yr. in January. What's the deal? Does it usually take this long? Not one green egg in 4+ months! I can't believe it is taking this long. Has anyone else encountered such a long molt?
     
  2. suzettex5

    suzettex5 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May not just be the molt- ALOT of chickens slow down , and even stop, laying during the winter months. Seems like a individual thing to me, not always a breed thing. If shes healthy, not egg bound, then you may just have to wait till spring and its longer days. You could try rigging up some artificial light to her coop, 4 extra hours a day may do it.
     
  3. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    It's a combination of the molt and reduced day length. Daylength is increasing and she may lay soon. Wait, I just heard something- yes, go check, I think she just laid.[​IMG]
     
  4. wsdareme

    wsdareme Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Put a 40w light on a timer and give them an extra 4 hours of light, and you'll have green eggs in no time! Are you going to eat them with ham? [​IMG]
     
  5. Pharm Girl

    Pharm Girl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well, I guess I won't worry then. They have a red heat light in their coop, I leave it on for a few hours after they go to roost then turn it off. If it's below freezing, I leave it on all night. She's quite healthy and happy, so I guess I'll just have to wait it out. My other three continued to lay me 3-6 a week throughout the winter, so it seemed strange to get none from her for so long. [​IMG]

    ...and yes, we will eat the green eggs with ham when we ever get one again! [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2011
  6. suzettex5

    suzettex5 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm sure you know this already, but the red light does not count as artificial light in a coop. Something to do with chickens not being able to see the light in that color? So if you want to add light, it needs to be a white bulb, something to simulate the sun. Sorry if you already knew this, just wanted to toss the ifo out there. [​IMG]
     
  7. Pharm Girl

    Pharm Girl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nope! I really didn't know that. Thanks! I work in Woman's imaging and have taken OB/gyn boards, so I'm quite familiar with human fertility. That said, I wonder if chicken fertility is similar in that they are born with all the "eggs" they will every have. Therefore, if they take winter breaks they can extend their egg laying vs. giving them fake lighting and having them throw all their eggs out over the first few years. Does that make sense? I'd be happy if taking natural breaks makes them have more future eggs. My ladies are my pets, so I don't plan to cull unless they get sick. I'd be happy if they save some eggs for their "golden years".
    4 months was kind of a big break though!
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2011
  8. obaan1

    obaan1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have 3 EEs that have been on break since fall, also. One just started laying again on Monday so I'm hoping the rest will follow shortly. Can't wait for spring!!
     
  9. egg proof

    egg proof Out Of The Brooder

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    Ditto here. The only 2 not laying are EE's. The rest just keep chugging along.
     
  10. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    Yes, they are allocated X number of eggs for their lifetime. This is why the high production bred birds have a shorter productive lifespan. They get it all done in a couple of years. Many non production bred hens lay throughout their lifetimes just at a reduced rate as they age.
     

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