How long do I separate out the bully and what if theres more than one?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by jeningilroy, Oct 14, 2016.

  1. jeningilroy

    jeningilroy Out Of The Brooder

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    I have six hens and there are two that are relentless on my little Americauna who happens to be molting right now. Do I isolate them? If so, how? For how long? And where? Totally away from the coop?
     
  2. minihorse927

    minihorse927 Whipper snapper Premium Member

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    I would isolate the bullies. Put them into a separate cage and remove them from the coop completely for 1 to 2 weeks. This will force them to reestablish pecking order and usually helps with pecking issues.
     
  3. jeningilroy

    jeningilroy Out Of The Brooder

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    oh wow, okay. Any suggestions on how to set that up? Could they have separate quarters inside the run?
     
  4. minihorse927

    minihorse927 Whipper snapper Premium Member

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    Got a big dog cage? That usually works ok for a little while. They need to be unable to see or hear each other.
     
  5. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    My Coop
    No one asked this in your other thread
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1137778/molting-or-bullying

    How much space do they all have....how big is your coop and run in feet by feet??
    Pics of coop and run would be very helpful.
    More info on what and how exactly what you are feeding might help too.

    If you have room in the run, yes, you can put up a separation wall for immediate relief.....
    ...but for longer term solutions, let's figure out exactly what the problem is.
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2016
  6. LadyWolf0994

    LadyWolf0994 New Egg

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    I am having the same problem. I have seperated the bully for two weeks and then at night reintroduced her to the flock. She is still pick at the tail of the younger girl. They are only 2 months apart in age.
     
  7. Mrs. K

    Mrs. K Overrun With Chickens

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    Often times this is an issue with space. Often times what was enough space for chicks, is not enough space for full grown birds. As Art says, measure.

    Sometimes there are just more aggressive birds. Personally, I solve problems for the flock, when you have a very aggressive bird that harasses the other birds, that causes a lot of tension in the flock. Sometimes just reducing your flock by one or two birds, gives everyone enough space and those left get along. Pull the aggressive birds, and see if you like how the flock gets along. If another bird picks on the victim, reverse. Pull the victim, see how the flock gets along.

    It is always worthwhile, to try the pulling out of a bird, to see if you can reset the pecking order. Often times there is not a long term change. Then you need to cull a bird or two. A peaceful flock is much more healthy than a flock that is continually stressed.

    Mrs K
     
  8. meeko626

    meeko626 Out Of The Brooder

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    I had a similar issue with an Easter Egger that I tried integrating into my home flock. I just kept an eye on them and made sure that there was no blood drawn. Make sure there are enough hiding spaces in the run. A couple 5 gallon buckets and some logs worked for me and let the EE get away. But, my rule of thumb is that as long as no blood is drawn, let them deal with it on their own, but isolate if there is blood.
     

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