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How long do isa Browns / red sex links live and lay?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Prareedawn, Mar 8, 2015.

  1. Prareedawn

    Prareedawn Out Of The Brooder

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    May 27, 2012
    First off yes my girls are true ISAs from Zeeland. They will be three years old in May. One died last year and so now we have 3 isas and 3 RIRs. In year I to 2 we would get an average of 6 eggs a day every day. Now going into year 3 it's two most days. I'm guessing the isas are done at this point. I can't find a lot of clear cut into on their life span. I only ever see the Reds in the nesting boxes. I'm wondering if it's even worth my time to seperate them to see or just be sure the Reds are the ones laying. I am hoping to get some new chicks this week and have to make the decision on who stays and who goes before the babies are ready to go out to the coop probably in May. Does anyone have any good information on how long the sex links really do lay and live for? I'm looking into longer term layers this time rather then high production. Keeping these babies inside for 6+ weeks is a lot of work just to have to replace them a couple years later lol!
     
  2. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    Your data confirms what is likely the effective laying life of MOST ISA Browns. Birds are individuals. One cannot make iron clad statements that over generalize. However, as you yourself can see, these are commercial birds and are not bred for the long haul. Are there individual exceptions? Of course. Testimonies abound about this or that particular bird laying well for 4 years, but exceptions do not change the rule, the average intended for the strain by ISA/Hendrix Corporation.

    They were developed for the industry, which has different needs than the backyarder.
    Two years and done fits the industry's needs very well, but may not meet your desires for a longer, somewhat slower, but steady layer.
     
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