How long does it take to home a bird?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Tropical Chook, Sep 19, 2010.

  1. Tropical Chook

    Tropical Chook Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well, at long last I have got the rooster I've been dreaming about. He is a HUGE Thai game cock and he really is a good looking boy. My question is how long do I need to keep him confined to the coop before I can let him out to free range with the rest of the flock? If I let him out now, would he hang around with the other birds, or would he make off in search of his old home, given that I have only had him for about 12 hours?

    Thanks for any and all advice [​IMG]
     
  2. Sir Birdaholic

    Sir Birdaholic Night Knight

    I would let him loose to meet his new family. He may wander a little, to check out the area,but won't go in search of his old home, unless he came from next door. Don't startle him, or get him excited for a couple of days, or give him a reason to panic & bolt, so he can settle in.
     
  3. sonew123

    sonew123 Poultry Snuggie

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    have you thought about quarantining him for the 30 day period??? Just to make sure he is not silently ill-carries bugs etc...??? ps glad you go a beauty roo:)
     
  4. jaimslee4u

    jaimslee4u Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I had a new roo with my flock and made a mistake of letting him out after the first couple days assuming he would find his own way in at night. Well I ended up searching for him one night in the pitch black for about two hours. Thank God he showed up the next morning. So just as an FYI - if you do let him out during the day make sure you corral him in before dark until he knows where his bed is!
     
  5. Tropical Chook

    Tropical Chook Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for the replies. I can't really quarantine him as I don't have facilities to do so, but I'm sure he's in good health. I inspected the previous owners birds and their living conditions and the birds all seemed to be in very good health. I think I'll leave him in the coop until a little later in the day and then turn him loose to meet his girls. I really wish I could post a pic, but my computer won't recognize any USB devices. Once I get that fixed, some pics will follow.

    Again, thanks for the replies

    TC
     
  6. Tropical Chook

    Tropical Chook Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well, I guess I learned the hard way, because I went ahead and let him out with the flock and I've not seen him since.[​IMG] Anyway, fortunately I was able to find a replacement, and this one is even bigger and has won prizes as well. The great thing is that some good has actually come from this, in that the one I have now has been used for fighting, so he can now hang up his gloves and live peacefully as a lover with his ladies. In fact, it took him no longer than a few minutes to make it perfectly clear that he is now the one in charge. My other younger and smaller rooster has also had enough common sense to stay well clear [​IMG] Another benefit of getting one which has been used for fighting is that he's used to being handled. I can walk up to him and pick him up without any effort at all, and he really enjoys a bit of pampering. These Thai fighting cocks can be so brutal towards other roosters, and yet they are so calm and well behaved with people. Of course he will remain in the run/coop or tethered for at least ten days before I give him his freedom. Will post pics when I get a chance [​IMG]
     
  7. Mahonri

    Mahonri Urban Desert Chicken Enthusiast Premium Member

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    You live and learn.

    Glad you are rehoming this roo to a better place.
     
  8. Tropical Chook

    Tropical Chook Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes, I'm sure he'll have a better life here with me. Don't get me wrong, the Thais take great care of their fighting cocks, especially if the bird has gained a reputation of being a strong fighter, but of course that also means the birds are made to fight. What I find amazing is that you quite often have several of these birds in a run together, and yet they don't spend all day fighting. Anyway, considering I wanted a big rooster to breed in some size to my flock, and I knew I would have to buy such a bird, I just thought it would be nice to "save" one of the fighting cocks, even if it meant I had to pay more. The one I have now did have a reputation for being a good fighter, so of course he was doomed to a long life of fighting. Those that don't prove themselves as being worthwhile in terms of fighting are given up on after a few fights, but the good ones get kept. Hopefully, because mine is so able, he'll be able to really look after his girls like a good rooster should. [​IMG]

    My other rooster who is now about four and a half months old will unfortunately be processed, as will all the other roosters once they're big enough. I really cannot have more than one, and besides, that was the original plan anyway as we are raising some birds for eggs, and the rest are for the table.

    Take care everyone.....[​IMG]
     

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