How long to roast very large turkey?

Discussion in 'Turkeys' started by DCS, Dec 24, 2010.

  1. DCS

    DCS Chillin' With My Peeps

    141
    1
    121
    Nov 26, 2008
    So I let "Mr Christmas" grow too long...

    I butchered on Sunday, and he's been resting on ice, but I wonder how long we should roast him.

    He dressed at 38 lbs! I think we have a pan large enough, and the whole point was to keep him intact, rather than only roast half or a quarter. And yes, we LOVE leftovers, which will be spread between several families.

    The Butterball hotline only goes up to turkeys that are 30 lbs. Not a problem I ever thought I'd have!

    Thanks for any help,
    Danielle
     
  2. Olive Hill

    Olive Hill Overrun With Chickens

    4,203
    73
    253
    Apr 19, 2009
    I'd think 10-12 hours would probably do it. That said, even if you have a pan large enough your oven may not give enough clearance to do it, and most certainly not well. I'm thinking he'll be cooked rather unevenly. Live and learn.
     
  3. DCS

    DCS Chillin' With My Peeps

    141
    1
    121
    Nov 26, 2008
    We measured the oven before I even attempted to travel with it, and it will fit. Plan to wrap in foil, and we'll just see what happens.
     
  4. terri9630

    terri9630 Chillin' With My Peeps

    663
    3
    141
    Mar 22, 2009
    New Mexico
    Buy a probe thermometer to monitor the inside temp of the bird. That way you can be sure it's done. I've bought them at walmart for, if I remember right, $12. Just insert the probe into the thickest part of the breast and set the temp. The probe stays in the bird while cooking.
     
  5. al6517

    al6517 Real Men can Cook

    10,684
    96
    321
    May 13, 2008
    The normal formula is 20 min per lb @ 325 degrees unstuffed.................. Stuffed is 30 min per lb. Whatever you do don't dry it out by over cooking it because it's so big, use a meat thermometer inserted into the thigh area away from the bone and it should read 170 degrees when done.

    AL
     
  6. al6517

    al6517 Real Men can Cook

    10,684
    96
    321
    May 13, 2008
    Quote:Never insert it into the breast, the breast cooks faster and you will end up with a severly under cooked bird. Any real cook will tell you always temp check in the thigh.

    AL
     
  7. terri9630

    terri9630 Chillin' With My Peeps

    663
    3
    141
    Mar 22, 2009
    New Mexico
    Quote:Never insert it into the breast, the breast cooks faster and you will end up with a severly under cooked bird. Any real cook will tell you always temp check in the thigh.

    AL

    I was actually taught to place the probe into the thickest part of the meat which on a turkey is the breast. I've never had a problem doing this and don't end up with dried out breast meat.
     
  8. greenriver

    greenriver Chillin' With My Peeps

    195
    0
    99
    Dec 19, 2010
    Wilmington, Il
  9. DCS

    DCS Chillin' With My Peeps

    141
    1
    121
    Nov 26, 2008
    Well, he was delicious!!!

    Mom has a large convection oven, and the thighs reached 170 at about 6 hours; the breast took a bit longer (We cleaved off the thighs and drumsticks at that point). I thought it would be the opposite, but this was a huge BBB bird, and the breasts were much thicker than the thighs. I think it would have taken a LOT longer if it weren't for the "convection roast" setting on her oven.

    So juicy, so delicious! (And so many leftovers for sandwiches!!!)

    I'll never let one get that big again, but the WOW factor was pretty cool, honestly.
     
    Last edited: Dec 25, 2010
  10. longranger

    longranger Chillin' With My Peeps

    554
    0
    149
    Apr 23, 2009
    laguna hills CA
    Seeing the bird whole is fun but after the wows and before cooking that size bird often does better cut into breast, Legs etc.. That way everything comes out of the oven perfect. Also the smaller individual pieces cook a little faster so the bird finishes quicker. Keeping a big boy like that in 1 piece is fun though isn't it?
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by