How many chickens can fit in here?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by pasta514, Aug 5, 2008.

  1. pasta514

    pasta514 Out Of The Brooder

    [​IMG]

    The run is 4x8x2h. the coop is 3x4 top and bottom. One nest box and 4 feet of perch.

    Have 3 chickens so far and now the family wants more.
     
  2. Heather J

    Heather J Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Unless you have banties, you've about hit your limit. You might get away with one more...or you could always do what I'm doing and build a second coop. lol
     
  3. ThreeBoysChicks

    ThreeBoysChicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 19, 2007
    Thurmont, MD
    I think you need to consider your climate. You have the underneath and the coop itself right? If you do not have harsh winters, then technically you have twice the space. As for your run, do you alow them free range a lot?

    Edited for typo.
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2008
  4. arlee453

    arlee453 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 13, 2007
    near Charlotte NC
    I agree - IF you are free ranging a good part of the day so that they don't spend a lot of time inside the coop/run, then I think you could have at least 6 chickens in there.

    If they are spending the majority of daylight hours in the coop/run, then I'd go no more than 3-4.

    It's not like you will have to lock them up in the coop during the winter like someone in a much colder climate. BUT if you are not able to let them out of the run for a large part of the day then you'll need to hold back.....OR build a bigger/another coop [​IMG]
     
  5. digitS'

    digitS' Chillin' With My Peeps

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    ID/WA border
    That's a real good lookin' set-up.

    With more-or-less full-sized coops, we don't usually need to be concerned about cubic feet of air. However, structures of this size require a look at more than just floor space. That said, with a mild climate and the chance to get out and under - an "extra" bird isn't likely to cause any suffering.

    The rule of thumb is that 3 cubic feet is needed for every pound of chicken in permanent indoor housing. With a ceiling high enuf for humans and without caging and the stacking of cages, there's usually more reason to be concerned about floor space for the birds. With your low, low ceiling, closing up this little house in bad weather could turn it into a very unhealthy place if there were very many birds in there.

    At 3' x 4', they've got 12 square feet of floor space. If the average height is 3.5', the birds only have 42 cubic feet. Divide 42 by 3 and the rule of thumb says that you've only enuf room for 14 pounds of chickens.

    If they are 4.5 pound leghorns, there's room for 3. Of course, if they are not really closed in, there isn't as much concern.

    Steve
     
  6. digitS'

    digitS' Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 12, 2007
    ID/WA border
    Is that a pivot system so that the top of the coop seperates from the bottom?!?

    Is that a vent there in the back?

    I'll say it again: that's a real good lookin' set-up.

    Steve
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2008
  7. spatcher

    spatcher Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Virginia - Southside
    Most people think that 4 sq ft per bird is the norm. You can get by with less if they have room to roost and sleep at night. That, theoretically is all the room you need. They do need room in the run to stretch however so that should be your main concern.
     
  8. pasta514

    pasta514 Out Of The Brooder

    digitS' :

    Is that a pivot system so that the top of the coop seperates from the bottom?!?

    Is that a vent there in the back?

    I'll say it again: that's a real good lookin' set-up.

    Steve

    Thanks Steve, Yep the lid pivots and the center of gravity holds it in either the open or closed position. you can see more about it on my page

    and here's a little video of the operation of the lid :​
     
  9. Mahonri

    Mahonri Urban Desert Chicken Enthusiast Premium Member

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    May 14, 2008
    North Phoenix
    My Coop
    Looking at it, I'd say 4 banties or 3 normal sized hens.
     
  10. pasta514

    pasta514 Out Of The Brooder

    digitS' :

    That's a real good lookin' set-up.

    With more-or-less full-sized coops, we don't usually need to be concerned about cubic feet of air. However, structures of this size require a look at more than just floor space. That said, with a mild climate and the chance to get out and under - an "extra" bird isn't likely to cause any suffering.

    The rule of thumb is that 3 cubic feet is needed for every pound of chicken in permanent indoor housing. With a ceiling high enuf for humans and without caging and the stacking of cages, there's usually more reason to be concerned about floor space for the birds. With your low, low ceiling, closing up this little house in bad weather could turn it into a very unhealthy place if there were very many birds in there.

    At 3' x 4', they've got 12 square feet of floor space. If the average height is 3.5', the birds only have 42 cubic feet. Divide 42 by 3 and the rule of thumb says that you've only enuf room for 14 pounds of chickens.

    If they are 4.5 pound leghorns, there's room for 3. Of course, if they are not really closed in, there isn't as much concern.

    Steve

    Well the average height of the enclosed area is 2.5 feet, so it's only 30 cu.ft. But they always have access to go down to the lower level which is 4x3x1.5 and open on two sides. Combined, that's 48 cu.ft.

    The hens are 2 EE and a SLW. I'm thinking I need another vent or two... currently there are 2 vents and the opening to the stairs. In total a little over 1 sq.ft. of vent. I'm think a vent on both sidewalls and converting the window so it can open. Do I have to be concerned about winter drafts? The temps here rarely freeze and typically around 45 night, 55 day in winter.​
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2008

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