How many chickens per rooster?

Discussion in 'New Member Introductions' started by hcrussow, Jan 30, 2015.

  1. hcrussow

    hcrussow New Egg

    3
    0
    7
    Jan 30, 2015
    SW MO
    I have 1 buff rooster, 4 buff hens, 2 leghorn rooster, 2 leghorn hens and 5 plymouth rock hens. So, 3 roosters to 11 hens. Is that too many roosters? The leghorns are all 10 months old and all the rest are a year old. The roosters have been fighting a lot over the last couple of months. Blood baths a few times. The buff rooster never seems to have a drop of blood or even a scratch on him, hes the biggest. Do I need to thin down the rooster population?
     
  2. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

    83,466
    11,815
    816
    Aug 26, 2009
    Out to pasture
    Roosters can & will often fight to the death over hens. Rule of thumb is one rooster for 10 hens or so. So one guy would be very happy, the other two would be trying to dethrone him constantly. Also hens can be overbred (too many guys) to the point of damage and death. IF you don't need fertile eggs for hatching or sale, you don't even need a rooster. Hens will be happy to lay eggs (non fertile) without them.
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. matt44644

    matt44644 Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,490
    111
    168
    Sep 14, 2014
    Sanilac County,Michigan
    [​IMG]
    x2 on drumstickdiva's post
     
  4. Michael OShay

    Michael OShay Chicken Obsessed

    25,582
    2,156
    438
    May 14, 2014
    Montana
    Welcome to BYC. Glad you decided to our flock. X3 on 10 hens for every 1 rooster. As they mature, too many roosters will become very hard physically on your hens, over-breeding them, biting and plucking the feathers from their necks and backs, battering them, and potentially, seriously injuring them. The only reason you need a rooster is to fertilize eggs for hatching, and 1 rooster can easily handle 10 hens in this regard. I currently have 25 hens and no roosters in my flock, and I get loads of eggs without all the aggression, fights, biting and feather plucking, feeding of non-productive mouths, crowing in the middle of the night, drop off in egg production due to stress, over-breeding and battering of hens due to having roosters (especially too many). My hens are stress free and enjoying life without a rooster around. Please feel free to ask any questions you may have. We are here to help in any way we can. Good luck in thinning out your roosters.
     
  5. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

    23,342
    1,231
    448
    Nov 27, 2008
    Jacksonville, Florida
    Welcome to BYC. x4 Drumstick Diva's post.
     
  6. BantamFan4Life

    BantamFan4Life LOOK WHAT YOU MADE ME DO. Premium Member

    84,499
    3,807
    646
    Jun 15, 2012
    Washington
    My Coop
    Welcome to BYC!
     
  7. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

    23,605
    1,323
    396
    Jul 24, 2013
    [​IMG] I'm glad you joined us!

    Sometimes, that many roosters can coexist together with only 11 hens (or no hens). However, the fact that your roosters are fighting proves that they can't. It would probably be better for both the roosters and the hens if you got rid of 1-2 of the roosters.
     
  8. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

    20,569
    1,163
    391
    Jul 24, 2013
    Welcome to BYC! [​IMG]

    I would thin the rooster population. Roosters should have at least ten hens each, to prevent fighting.

    Good luck with your flock!
     
  9. sunflour

    sunflour Flock Master Premium Member

    13,952
    3,124
    436
    Jan 10, 2013
    Macon,GA
    [​IMG] Glad you joined us, good luck with your decisions about the roos.
     
  10. Mountain Peeps

    Mountain Peeps Change is inevitable, like the seasons Premium Member

    28,340
    4,326
    516
    Apr 23, 2014
    At our lodge
    My Coop
    Welcome to BYC! Please make yourself at home and we are here to help.

    The above members have answered your question quite nicely.

    Glad you joined!
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by