How many hens?

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by Brady bunch, Jul 21, 2019.

  1. Brady bunch

    Brady bunch Songster

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    31407686-81DC-4DB1-BE2E-ECC5D7ACADCB.jpeg We have 6 chickens and we don’t know how many of them are girls or boys. How can you tell them apart?
     
  2. Lady of McCamley

    Lady of McCamley Crowing

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    Do you know the approximate age?

    And we need individual photos to help. :D

    If the same sibling group, same age, males will get larger redder combs first. As they mature they will develop spiky feathers at the small of their back just before the tail, called saddle feathers. Often red coloring comes to the wing bows, but not all breeds show that.
    LofMc
     
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  3. Brady bunch

    Brady bunch Songster

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    They are around 19-20 weeks.
    So a picture of each?
     
  4. Lady of McCamley

    Lady of McCamley Crowing

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    Yes. And I can say that at 19 to 20...you look to possibly have several roosters...those with the large red combs and wattles, while the smaller combs and wattles will be female.

    HOWEVER, you are to point of lay in most breeds, and the girls take a growth spurt where their combs and wattles get red. They will also squawk and squat, and linger in the nest box.

    But for accuracy, full profile shots of each individual bird for help sexing by us. :D

    LofMc

    EDITED TO SAY: I don't see saddle feathers on any of the birds in the photo....so comb growth could be just due to faster growth....like any sibling variance. Individual photos best :D
     
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  5. Brady bunch

    Brady bunch Songster

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    6590FA9B-B2D7-45D1-BD72-483F058E9E72.jpeg 6590FA9B-B2D7-45D1-BD72-483F058E9E72.jpeg 69F28951-4C75-4121-9B8F-28A9D9889FFF.jpeg Here are some I need to take more. 12576684-C549-4280-8CD3-45000866616C.jpeg DA1C921D-05CF-489A-9FFD-BE85046DDDB1.jpeg 6590FA9B-B2D7-45D1-BD72-483F058E9E72.jpeg 6590FA9B-B2D7-45D1-BD72-483F058E9E72.jpeg 69F28951-4C75-4121-9B8F-28A9D9889FFF.jpeg 36D94C7A-7DFF-4A39-B7E7-CD557C343CBE.jpeg Sorry if the pictures are bad or hard to tell from.
     

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  6. Mrs. K

    Mrs. K Crowing

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    I agree, I did not see any saddle feathers. I think you have several pullets. The wattles can kind of go either way at this stage. If any of the chick reddened up long before the others - he is probably a rooster. Also if one or two of them is taller than the flock mates - rooster.

    Truthfully, have had chickens for years, and not too many years ago, was out there in the run, and he crowed...the first I knew of it. So it can be tricky. But in my experience, if I have ever looked and thought...could this be a rooster...they generally are.

    I had that thought about one of your birds, a group of birds, and the one on the far right, just gave me that vibe.

    Soon it will be self evident. People tend to know by 18 weeks.

    Mrs K
     
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  7. Brady bunch

    Brady bunch Songster

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    :jumpyWell you may be right because we are pretty sure that 3 may be roosters the one that you mentioned to the far right is the most stubborn, loudest chicken.
    Thanks for all of the help!
     
  8. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

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    At that age it can be hard to tell, except for the crowing.
    6-8 weeks it's easy to tell by comb size and color.
     
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  9. Frazzemrat1

    Frazzemrat1 Free Ranging

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    no male saddle feathers... I'd say all pullets.
     
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