How much light to provide as days get shorter?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by m_shuman, Sep 12, 2011.

  1. m_shuman

    m_shuman Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 22, 2011
    Springfield, GA
    We do not have electricity in our coop because there is no way to run it from the house plus DH dosen't want to run electricity to the coop because then the coop becomes a taxable structureon our property in the county we live in. I would like to try to add light to our coop in the winter and was wondering if a few solar lights around the run and in the chicken house would be enough for the girls to continue laying throughout the winter?
     
  2. peachachecha

    peachachecha Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 2, 2011
    I don't know, that is a good question. I have read though that all you need is enough light to read a newspaper. Maybe that would be enough, depending on how many lights you have.
     
  3. Nicole01

    Nicole01 Overrun With Chickens

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    Mar 28, 2011
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    We do have a light due to not having any windows. Our coop is in our garage and we use a standard door as their window and entrance to the run. We only use the light with big thunderstorms or subzero tempatures. We go by the sun as far as the light duration. I've heard and read that you can over run your chickens by making them lay too much. We are planning on keeping them forever, so we are trying to be as natural as possible. I believe we have a couple breeds that lay right through the winter.
     
  4. m_shuman

    m_shuman Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 22, 2011
    Springfield, GA
    Bump.
     
  5. m_shuman

    m_shuman Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 22, 2011
    Springfield, GA
    Anybody?
     
  6. snooky1959

    snooky1959 New Egg

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    Mar 11, 2011
    Can you run a drop cord out to the coop? That's what we do in the winter. The lightbulb should help keep it warm enough as well as provide light on those short days of winter. My neighbor puts hers on a timer in the winter and has it come on around 3:30 a.m. and it goes off about the time of normal winter dark hours. Her hens seem to be very happy with this arrangement.
     
  7. cindylo

    cindylo Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 2, 2011
    Idaho Falls, ID
    We haven't added any artificial light yet to the coops but I have noticed that their egglaying times are later in the morning than they were a month ago. So I'm interested in what the experts have to say. Otherwise, I'll add a bit of light to the morning hours consistent with a wake up time of 6:00-6:30 or so.
     
  8. C17

    C17 Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 27, 2011
    Blythewood
    Try using a solar product.....
     
  9. cindylo

    cindylo Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 2, 2011
    Idaho Falls, ID
    Wow - Solar lights wold be a great idea so wiring from the house out to the coop wouldn't be needed! Maybe less of a fire risk?
     
  10. vsmenagerie

    vsmenagerie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 23, 2011
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    Ive been reading and for consistent laying, it seems 14 hours of light is needed. I am going to be looking into putting a light in on a timer, so they have a little more time in the evening, since they go to bed about 8 pm it seems, and while its still a little light out, not enough and then wake them up a little earlier. Still trying to decide when. 6 am maybe?
     

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