how often do you need to add new blood?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by cestial225, Nov 23, 2013.

  1. cestial225

    cestial225 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    For a sustainable flock how often do you need to bring in a new Roo? Can you breed father to daughter, grandaughter? If I keep the same roo for many generations when will it cause problems with my flock or will it ever?
     
  2. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    I had the same rooster for 4 years and did just fine. I'm now considering which of his offspring to keep. All chicks hatched have been hardy and healthy, good layers. I figure if/when I start getting hatching issues, unthrifty chicks, things like that, I'll bring in a new rooster.

    Then again, I'm thinking of bringing in a new guy next spring cause I'm wanting to go a different direction with my chicks. I'm fortunate enough to have room for multiple roosters.
     
  3. cestial225

    cestial225 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I plan to always keep two roosters just in case I lose one, I don't want to have a roosterless flock. But as far as I can tell right now only the head roo mounts the hens.

    Have you hatched any chicks from father/daughter matings?
     
  4. Katt66

    Katt66 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm wondering the same thing.

    I know in breeding is less of a problem with some animals. What about chickens? Can I keep breeding the same rooster to the flock for a few generations?
     
  5. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    These birds are all from father/daughter matings. They haven't started laying yet (and of course some of them will never lay!), waiting for longer days. But I had 100% hatch & survival rates under my broody hens.

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    They're healthy, active birds. All had my black sex link rooster for a father, and various mixed daughters of his. If he'd been younger, I'd have kept him for another year or so, but at 4 he had been de-throned by a young rooster.
     
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