how old is too old for a roo

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by abhaya, Dec 18, 2010.

  1. abhaya

    abhaya Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 5, 2010
    cookeville, tn
    will a roo be able to fertileize eggs his entire life once he starts?
     
  2. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    Depends on the individual and the breed. Outcrossed, vigorous breeds tend to remain fertile their entire lifetime; whereas, inbred less vigorous strains lose fertility earlier.
     
  3. peacockfarmer1

    peacockfarmer1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 11, 2010
    a rooster is fertile until he is about 4 or 5 from my experiance
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2010
  4. Bantimna

    Bantimna Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 29, 2009
    South Africa
    It depends on the breed, and on the roosters health.
    Healthy, vigorous breeds tend to be fertile for a number of years, but with all things as they start to age their fertility also decreases. If you have a old rooster he should be able to do his "job", but there are many factors that determine how fertile he'll be.
     
  5. abhaya

    abhaya Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 5, 2010
    cookeville, tn
    Cool my boy is young about a year old I was judt wondering how long he would be doing his jog
     
  6. saladin

    saladin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I agree with the first sentence. The last sentence is very misleading.

    Many breeders desire highly inbred lines. To maintain these lines we choose on the most vigorous of stock; otherwise you'd lose the line.

    A good highly inbred cock with no health problems should be fertile for years and years. I have used inbred cocks that were over 10 years of age. Granted, I used them with pullets and only single mated, but the cocks were fertile nonetheless.
     
  7. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    Inbred "less vigorous." Nothing was mentioned about those instances where fertility has been selected for along with other traits. Case in point: I had a friend who had a flock of white crested black Polish bantams that was derived from a single pair. I had the incubator and did all of his hatching. Most of his roosters were non fertile by their second year. A trait that he had inadvertantly selected for as he selected for type. I am fully aware that fertility need not diminish in any species simply because of inbreeding. I made a living working with inbred rat and mouse strains. "Less vigorous" was included so that my post would not be misleading.[​IMG]
     
  8. saladin

    saladin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    sourland,
    What I found misleading was the contrast between vigourous outcross and less vigourous inbred; that's all. I just wanted to make it clear that inbreeding need not lead to less vigour.
     
  9. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    I could have, should have been more clear. I raise dogs and pigeons for competition and know the importance of in/line breeding. The lack of clarity was definately on my part.
     
  10. DPC poultry

    DPC poultry Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 18, 2010
    Mt. washington Ky
    when do they start?
     

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