How predator savvy are guineas?

Discussion in 'Guinea Fowl' started by sweeterdeeter42, Apr 7, 2011.

  1. sweeterdeeter42

    sweeterdeeter42 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 10, 2011
    Northern Illinois
    How predator savvy are guineas? I would like to add some to my yard, but I don't know much about them other than the basics. My neighbor had them once, and it seemed like he just couldn't get rid of them!
     
  2. robin416

    robin416 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 6, 2007
    Very. Guineas react the moment something or someone foreign shows up in their domain. That is how they survive in the jungle. That does not mean they are not easy pickings on an outdoors nest or roosting in trees.
     
  3. peacockfarmer1

    peacockfarmer1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've got a few guineas that have been running my land for 2 or 3 years and the only ones ive ever lost where the hen assuming they started setting on their nest and an animal got them. now i try to put all the females up for breeding season
    guineas fly very well
     
  4. fowlin

    fowlin Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 26, 2011
    im new to guineas also, though seems to be a general consensuses that they are tough indeed. we went with sixteen figuring safety in numbers. about putting the females up douse that reduce the teritory the males claim away from the coop?
     
  5. Pinky

    Pinky Chillin' With My Peeps

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    There are some wild guineas that roam my neighborhood. I think they escaped from someone's farm. They've lived on there own for 2 years now. There was some white ones too, but I haven't seen them since last year.
    My guineas will scream there head off at anything they think is a danger to them. So far they've let me know 3 times when a hawk landed in a tree nearby. They also saved one of my roosters that flew over the fence. A dog was attacking him and I heard the guineas in time to save the bird. They also scream when the cat goes in the back yard, and when I go outside without food for them.
     
  6. Texakan

    Texakan Out Of The Brooder

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    We started out with 10 guineas but lost 7 due to a dachsund and a freak flying incident. I think what I have left are 2 males and 1 female and they pretty much leave the chickens alone.I worry so much about them that I guess I'm a little obsessed with their safety. Amazing how I find them so cute and lovable!
     
  7. PeepsCA

    PeepsCA Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Big Oak Valley, CA
    I worry so much about them that I guess I'm a little obsessed with their safety.

    Try obsessing over 49 adults... lol [​IMG]

    I think you need a few more, you know... spread the love a little [​IMG]
     
  8. PeepsCA

    PeepsCA Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:My Guineas, as a flock are for the most part very predator savvy. They watch each other's backs and let me know whenever there's anything on the land that doesn't belong here. It's the dumb broody Hens sittin' on a pile of eggs out in the bushes that AREN'T savvy at all! [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2011
  9. Jen F

    Jen F Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 24, 2011
    Western/ Central KY
    TRUE or FALSE?

    A guinea needs to be raised on the land where you want them to live. (You can't buy them as an adult and bring them in and expect them to stay there)
     
  10. PeepsCA

    PeepsCA Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Big Oak Valley, CA
    Quote:False.

    You will however need to contain the birds for at least 4 weeks in their new coop/pen situation to learn where home is and learn where to roost before letting them out to free range for short periods at first, then gradually letting them out for longer and longer periods. They will need to be herded back in every night so they learn the routine and eventually go in on their own, or at least with minimal effort on your part.

    Adults, and even pullets and cockerels that are just purchased and immediately let loose will most likely fly off, or get eaten by predators very quickly because they do not know where home is.
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2011

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