How soon to re-breed dairy goat?

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by DaisyMeadow, Mar 3, 2013.

  1. DaisyMeadow

    DaisyMeadow Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 25, 2013
    Willamette Valley, OR
    We're new to dairy goats, and our first doe kidded on February 3. She nursed her doeling for 5 days, so she got the colostrum and a good, healthy start. Then the doeling went to her new home (with other goats and an experienced handler).

    We have since been sort of crash coursing it on milking, but seem to be doing pretty well. The doe is a Boer/Alpine mix and is just now a yearling (she came to us already bred), and she has really taken to being milked. I'd say we average about a quart a day of milk from her.

    From what I've read, dairy goats produce more milk when they get a little bit older and after their second kidding. So I'm wondering how soon should I breed her? How soon will she come into heat? And how long should I milk her into her pregnancy?

    We have a billy on site, so it's not much of a hassle to just let her into his pen.
     
  2. five days is a bit soon...
     
  3. DaisyMeadow

    DaisyMeadow Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've read everything from don't let them even start nursing, to three days just for the colostrum, to just about a week for them to just get started. The doeling went to a new home with several other goats, some in milk, so I knew she was going to be well cared for and get everything she needed. Also, that was when I could transport her.
     
  4. DaisyMeadow

    DaisyMeadow Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Just to clarify, my billy does not have (and has not had) access to my doe. They are in separate pens, and I plan to keep them separated until it's okay to re-breed her.
     
  5. bock

    bock Chillin' With My Peeps

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    They should not kid more that once a year. Alpines are seasonal breeders (September to January), but Boers breed year round. I guess you will just have to see about your girl. Do not re-breed her too soon, it is hard on their bodies and affects milk production. Also, try to breed up; not just to any random buck! This is a great resource: http://fiascofarm.com/sitemap.htm Good luck!
     
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  6. DaisyMeadow

    DaisyMeadow Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for the helpful input. I really don't want to breed her too soon. And that website looks very helpful, too. So much to learn about dairy goats.

    So, since she kidded in early February, it's a safe bet to breed her in the early fall? I was thinking of getting a bottle buckling from dairy stock this summer, since they seem to be plentiful and that should be "breeding up" if he's from a dairy line. My other doe is due June 5. So I can still use my billy for this doe in fall, then use the new buckling for my other doe in January, maybe. Open to suggestions, though.
     
  7. bock

    bock Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes, she should be fine to breed in fall as long as she looks in good condition for breeding and everything. :) Choosing a buck depends on what you are breeding for. A nice dairy buck is a good start if you want dairy animals. Even better, you could add some pure-breed proven dairy does to form the base of your genetics. Start off with good and breed for better! Our Nubian doe is due 3/30, and I so desperately wish I was allowed to keep a doeling out of her. But thus, I ended up with a stray puppy and promised no more animals. All well, I guess I can't keep them all! Have fun with your goats, you will never stop learning with goats around. :)
     
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  8. DaisyMeadow

    DaisyMeadow Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Our second doe (due June 5) is a purebred Alpine and was a bottle baby doe from a commercial goat dairy. So I think that's a pretty good start. Thanks for all the help!
     

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