how to breed with a mixed flock? seperate coops? free range together?

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by jgervais, Jun 16, 2011.

  1. jgervais

    jgervais Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a mixed flock of 6 (barred rocks, buff orp, EE, and Isa Browns) with one EE rooster right now.

    Chicken math is creeping up and I'm thinking about raising Dark Cornish's for meat - but economically, I think it makes more sense to have a mating pair and hatch my own eggs in the future.

    How the heck do you keep a mixed flock, and separate the mating pair, and know which eggs you're supposed to collect to hatch?! I would love for all my chickens to free range together --- will they go into their own separated coops at night? Any experience with this out there? Is it even possible?
    I'm thinking I'd have to get rid of my EE rooster and only have a Dark Cornish Roo?
     
  2. chickendales

    chickendales Chillin' With My Peeps

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    with ee's it easy u just hatch green eggs but he well also breed with everthing else in the yard too
     
  3. jgervais

    jgervais Chillin' With My Peeps

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    yeh, I'm hoping to only breed the dark cornish's.... so I assume he would have to go before I attempt to hatch eggs?
     
  4. leahthor

    leahthor Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ya, if you don't want the EE to breed the cornish too then you have to get rid of him or have the girls inaccessible to him by having him in a separate coop. I guess you could always caponize (sp) him but what would be the point unless he was to remain solely a pet.
     
  5. big medicine

    big medicine custom Brahmas

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    From a strictly economics point of few, you would most likely be ahead to buy broiler chicks each spring, on a meat/feed/time basis.

    My birds free range together with the exception of breeding season, then they are seperated into smaller breeding pens, and turned out together again after I am done collecting eggs.

    If you want to keep only Cornish out of a mixed flock, one option would be. Have only Cornish roosters, keep non Cornish hens that don't lay brown eggs. EE, leghorns, etc., or possibly very dark egg layers. Not fool proof but will tip the scales in your favor.
     
  6. jgervais

    jgervais Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I know this, but I just don't think I would like raising broilers based on others experience. I'm looking more for a bird that can forage and doesn't have the health problems of the crosses. I was thinking Dark Cornishes for this, but maybe a White Rock or a Delaware would be better? Seems everyone just raises x's, so its been really hard finding any info about other options.

    I think during mating season I can just separate a few hens with the rooster... that sounds like the best idea.
     
  7. ChickenAlgebra

    ChickenAlgebra Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 14, 2011
    When we want hatching eggs, we keep the pens seperate in their own area. They can all still see each other, but the roos are with the girls they are supposed to be with.

    When we don't want hatching eggs, they all just free range together.
     
  8. Zaxby's2

    Zaxby's2 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 10, 2011
    a place
    Quote:I agree. Just get a cornish rooster and a couple hens and put them in with your flock. When you want cornish eggs you can separate the cornish and hatch out only cornish eggs. [​IMG] Remember though that you might have to get your rooster young otherwise there might be fighting. There's always a chance that you'll have to separate the cornish entirely if it doesn't work out. You could also just by cornish chicks when you want them, so that you won't have to breed. So this leaves you with three options:
    1) try to introduce a cornish rooster and hen into the flock, and separate them when you need cornish eggs(remember that too many roosters with a few hens can hurt your hens)
    2) have a different flock with only cornish( you would be able to let them all free range together hopefully, but you would need to separate the cornish flock when you want only cornish eggs)
    3) buy and raise cornish chicks every time you want to raise and eat them
    Either of these might work, but here are your options. Good luck! [​IMG]
     
  9. chickendales

    chickendales Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Zaxby's2 :

    Quote:I agree. Just get a cornish rooster and a couple hens and put them in with your flock. When you want cornish eggs you can separate the cornish and hatch out only cornish eggs. [​IMG] Remember though that you might have to get your rooster young otherwise there might be fighting. There's always a chance that you'll have to separate the cornish entirely if it doesn't work out. You could also just by cornish chicks when you want them, so that you won't have to breed. So this leaves you with three options:
    1) try to introduce a cornish rooster and hen into the flock, and separate them when you need cornish eggs(remember that too many roosters with a few hens can hurt your hens)
    2) have a different flock with only cornish( you would be able to let them all free range together hopefully, but you would need to separate the cornish flock when you want only cornish eggs)
    3) buy and raise cornish chicks every time you want to raise and eat them
    Either of these might work, but here are your options. Good luck! [​IMG]

    if u free range the rooster well lern to stay way from each other​
     
  10. big medicine

    big medicine custom Brahmas

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    Quote:I agree. Just get a cornish rooster and a couple hens and put them in with your flock. When you want cornish eggs you can separate the cornish and hatch out only cornish eggs. [​IMG] Remember though that you might have to get your rooster young otherwise there might be fighting. There's always a chance that you'll have to separate the cornish entirely if it doesn't work out. You could also just by cornish chicks when you want them, so that you won't have to breed. So this leaves you with three options:
    1) try to introduce a cornish rooster and hen into the flock, and separate them when you need cornish eggs(remember that too many roosters with a few hens can hurt your hens)
    2) have a different flock with only cornish( you would be able to let them all free range together hopefully, but you would need to separate the cornish flock when you want only cornish eggs)
    3) buy and raise cornish chicks every time you want to raise and eat them
    Either of these might work, but here are your options. Good luck! [​IMG]

    if u free range the rooster well lern to stay way from each other

    Not necessarily, some strains of Cornish are pretty game. Where as some breeds will tolerate subordinate males around the perimiter of the flock after pecking order is established. It is not in the nature of some breeds to back down from a challange, or tolerate these other males. Just saying keep your eyes open if you try this.
     

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