How to do the deed when the time comes...

Discussion in 'Geese' started by ladyjey, Feb 11, 2012.

  1. ladyjey

    ladyjey Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 11, 2012
    Cape Cod, MA
    I am seriously considering getting 2 pairs of Pilgrim geese, which I may reduce down to 1 pair or a gander and 2 geese. I assume at some point they will increase their number. The thing is what to do when it's time to butcher that xmas dinner?

    I have meat rabbits and chickens and I before I committed to them I researched like mad to make sure I could find a way to kill (I don't think the word humanely applies to killing) with mercy. I really like it when their little brains say "Oh?, what's hap--." Get it? Can't seem to find any good info on dispatching geese. They seem quite a bit smarter than rabbits and chickens...

    The only merciful thing I've come across is to shoot them when they aren't looking... How do you get 1 aside without the others paying attention? Plus I only live on 1/2 an acre, not sure about firing a weapon in my neighborhood... And I'd have to get one and learn how to use it. I do recognize this may be the best way, though.

    Any suggestions anyone?
     
  2. littledear

    littledear Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 13, 2012
    Cabot, Arkansas
    They are much smarter than a chicken. That said my mom always wacked their heads off on the chopping block just like she did the chickens. I would put the others up in a coop when I did the deed and try to do it on the other side of the house away from them. I haven't actually had to kill any of my animals for food as I have always been lucky to have a man around to do it for me but my oldest daughter slaughters hers the same way my mom did hers as she feels it is fast and as humane as possible. Good luck!
     
  3. ladyjey

    ladyjey Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 11, 2012
    Cape Cod, MA
    Thanks littledear, yeah... I don't actually chop my chickens, I hold them in my lap head down and gently stroke and rub their throat till they get all sleepy and relaxed, then I cut their throats and hold them while they bleed out. It's like they don't feel it at all, they just kind of go to sleep until that last nerve response but they are pretty much unconscious by then. Would love to find a way so easy for the geese...

    I guess chopping them would be better for the neighbors but I imagine the goose would be pretty po'd while I was trying to hold it down on the chopping block! But maybe from the goose's point of view not so bad to "go out fighting" lol!
     
  4. littledear

    littledear Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You can do the same thing with your geese. They love to be petted and stroked. Mine are all gentle except the gander during season so I can't think of any reason why you couldn't do this with the geese.
     
  5. ladyjey

    ladyjey Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 11, 2012
    Cape Cod, MA
    The chickens get all sleepy and like in a trance when you hold them upside down for awhile, this happens with geese too??
     
  6. NYRIR

    NYRIR Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Petersburg,NY
    When my DH slaughters the geese he chops the head off on a chopping block. The only thing I don't like is no matter where the other geese are they can still hear. He does not butcher in front of the others because I think even the chickens and turkeys are smart enough to figure that out! We do not slaughter anyone in front of the other birds.
    I think your idea of shooting it would be good except for space...and where would the others be when the one gets shot?
     
  7. littledear

    littledear Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My geese get calm and sleepy when I hold them on my lap and stroke them. I haven't ever held them upside down, except for once when I caught my gander and turned him upside down because he was trying to bite me. He did calm right down when I did that and now he keeps his distance. I know what you mean about the chickens though as they do calm down when upsie down prior to butchering them.
     

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