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How to heat a coop for cold sensitive species

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by nevsma, Aug 31, 2015.

  1. nevsma

    nevsma Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 19, 2011
    Dodgeville, WI
    I will be getting a pair of Java green Peacocks in about a month, and I am almost finished building their enclosure. Java green peafowl cannot handle freezing temperatures and I must keep the coop above 35 degrees. I live in Wisconsin were it can get way below freezing in the winter, nights have gotten to -20 (maybe once or twice a winter). My shed will be fully insulated and heated, and that is where my question lies. What type of heater would be suggested? I will be using a heated perch, but that will not be enough to to warm the whole shed (it is 10'x12' with 8' walls). I thought about one of those oil radiators, but I am not sure if something better is out there. I am buying one of those outlets that turn on when the temp drops to 35 degrees and off at 45 degrees. Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2015
  2. csaylorchickens

    csaylorchickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My Coop
    More hens makes the temp go up in the coop. Using pine shavings on the floor helps and there are heating plates for the coop if you look on amazon. Depends on coop size but you can get one for each wall and it should help
     
  3. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

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    My Coop
    If you heat the whole shed, how are you going to handle ventilation......
    .....without spending ridiculous amounts of money on the heat?
     
  4. nevsma

    nevsma Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 19, 2011
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    To handle ventilation, the top of the shed has vent slots on both ends (basically in a lofted area) which is also above the insulated ceiling. I also will be able to open the windows if needed, and I am positive that I won't be able to make the door completely sealed up. The coop will only have two birds in it, as if I have more than that I will start having aggression/feather picking issues.
     
  5. MeepBeep

    MeepBeep Chillin' With My Peeps


    If you heat just above freezing temps, it's really not that hard to balance the two, nor is it that costly... During mild winter months, my heating bill on a 1800 sq/ft coop is about $100/month... During daylight hours on mild winter days the furnace hardly runs at all, I had several weeks last winter where I used only about 5 gallons of propane a week... During extreme cold, colder nights or windy weather I damper down the venting temporarily, to help retain heat...

    Back to the OP, for a small coop, I highly recommend flat radiant heaters, in a 'heating box' and of course wire it properly, no extension cords or exposed wires...

    If you use 'pig blankets' aka livestock nursing pads you can avoid worrying about a thematically control and for the most part negate any fire risk or burns as they only get about 20°F above ambient temps...

    This is my idea of a side view of a 'heating box' perch for the peas, make it just big enough for the peas to navigate and use, in addition to pig blankets on the back they can also be included on the sides... This box would be installed inside the coop replacing summer perching location...

    [​IMG]

    In the above you can see the radiant heater in red spaced off the rear (and possibly side walls) by 1" or 2" spacer blocks, allowing air flow over both sides.... Spaced off in front of that (in gray) is chicken wire to prevent the bird from physically laying against the heater... Even though it technically never would get to a burn temp it's best to avoid direct contact IMO... The peas will naturally roost head out so they get 'fresh' air, while the roof design and semi enclosed box traps warm air directly around them...

    May I asked did you get the java greens locally? I have been on a casual lookout for some in the local area and have not had much success in finding any...
     
  6. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

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    Nov 27, 2012
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    My Coop
     
  7. birds4kids

    birds4kids Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 15, 2015
    I would be looking for a way to keep a large mass heated so if the power goes out you have some reserve heat.
    I would probably look at infrared panels and have them aimed so they hit some concrete blocks or something for mass and cold as it is here I would expect to need a couple of them which would help too so that if one fails there is still something.
    Don't know where Dodgeville is but I am near Appleton and I couldn't imagine trying to keep a shed above 35. I keep a garage that warm but not ventilated.......
     
  8. 1965cobra

    1965cobra New Egg

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    Aug 19, 2014
    What is a heating box? My coop is 6 by 10 and insulated. Trying to find the best heat. Please be patient with me I am an old lady! Want to keep it above freezing maybe a little more. Have Seramas, Sultans. deanders, deuccles,showgirls , silkies, cochins.. I am in Ohio, 0 at times, what size and need thermoatat. WOW alot of questions.
     
  9. MeepBeep

    MeepBeep Chillin' With My Peeps


    You need ventilation, so you can't seal the coop up, insulation does little good on a small coop as said small coop requires a lot of ventilation and you are going to have big wide open vents for ventilation letting the heat out... Heating becomes a balancing game where you balance ventilation with heat lose and is much harder to do with small coops unless you brute force a lot of heat and know you are going to waste most of it...

    A heat box is what I pictured above, a small heated 'open room' inside the coop, this allows you to have ventilation in the coop as a whole, but also a warmer roosting area for the birds, it's what I would recommend for small coops...
     
  10. 1965cobra

    1965cobra New Egg

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    lookin at ceramic convection heater panel for my semi insulated 4 b 6 coop. , Wonder what the pros and cons on that are?
     

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