How to insulate vinyl shed?

SunKissed13

In the Brooder
Jun 19, 2019
12
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SW Michigan
We repurposed a 6x8 vinyl shed into our coop and it needs some kind of insulation. The location is on a corner of our property that gets a lot of wind and it’s cold enough that we have a couple chickens getting frostbit combs. We will not use a heat lamp in the coop.

What is a fairly economical way to insulate it that we could also remove for the summer months? We do have a wood frame inside that we could put something up and cover with particle board...just not sure what our best options are?
 

DobieLover

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We repurposed a 6x8 vinyl shed into our coop and it needs some kind of insulation. The location is on a corner of our property that gets a lot of wind and it’s cold enough that we have a couple chickens getting frostbit combs. We will not use a heat lamp in the coop.

What is a fairly economical way to insulate it that we could also remove for the summer months? We do have a wood frame inside that we could put something up and cover with particle board...just not sure what our best options are?
Insulation is not the solution.
You need more ventilation.
That may be difficult with a vinyl shed. Please post pictures for suggestions.
 

SunKissed13

In the Brooder
Jun 19, 2019
12
22
29
SW Michigan
It’s this shed. It has two small vents and then we added another two 9x2” vents (will try to find a good pic).

it seems well ventilated, there’s no odor or ammonia smell and we do not keep the waterer inside.

Ventilation was my first thought but I dismissed it as it SEEMS to be adequate - do we need more?
 

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aart

Chicken Juggler!
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do we need more?
Probably.
Measure the humidity inside and outside the coop, it should be about the same.

Would help to know....
Where in this world are you located?
Climate, and time of year, is almost always a factor.
Please add your general geographical location to your profile.
It's easy to do, (laptop version shown), then it's always there!
upload_2019-12-15_8-28-58.png
 

SunKissed13

In the Brooder
Jun 19, 2019
12
22
29
SW Michigan
Location updated! (SW Michigan)

I’ll go put a couple of hygrometers out this week and see how different it is inside vs out. If there’s a difference we will go ahead and add more vents to the shed

Probably.
Measure the humidity inside and outside the coop, it should be about the same.

Would help to know....
Where in this world are you located?
Climate, and time of year, is almost always a factor.
Please add your general geographical location to your profile.
It's easy to do, (laptop version shown), then it's always there!
View attachment 1981737
 

cmom

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Nov 18, 2007
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There are a lot of members from Michigan. You should get a lot of good advice. Good luck and have fun...
 

NatJ

Songster
Mar 20, 2017
401
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USA
vinyl shed...gets a lot of wind and it’s cold enough that we have a couple chickens getting frostbit combs. We will not use a heat lamp in the coop.

What is a fairly economical way to insulate it that we could also remove for the summer months? We do have a wood frame inside that we could put something up and cover with particle board...just not sure what our best options are?
If the wind is the problem, covering with something like a tarp could help. You would then have to make more openings for ventilation, but it would mean the air comes in where you want it to, so you can direct it away from where the chickens sleep.

For actual insulation, you could try something like foam panels (I think they're OK for damp environments, like between the rain and the chickens), covered with particle board so the chickens can't peck them. You would probably need more vent openings, because of making it leak less air all over. With enough ventilation, you would not need to remove insulation for summer: insulation does not provide heat, just makes it stay in or out better.

For something quick and temporary, you could pile plastic bags of fallen leaves, or bales of straw, or something similar around the outside. (Then use the leaves or straw for bedding next spring and summer.) Same warnings about needing to add ventilation if you cover up a lot of the sides.

Ventilation is a great thing, but I do worry a little about weather that's both wet AND cold--you're not likely to get it drier inside than it is outside! People closer to you would know better if weather like that is common or a problem.
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
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Nov 27, 2012
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Hi there!
We are about 15 miles east of South Haven off of 43
We are very close. Snowbelt Survivors!
Is this your first winter with chickens?


you're not likely to get it drier inside than it is outside!
Um, more than not likely, it's impossible...unless you install a total HVAC system :D
Where in the USA are you @NatJ ?
 

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