how to make a foot for baby chick

Discussion in 'New Member Introductions' started by kelly88, Feb 18, 2016.

  1. kelly88

    kelly88 Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 18, 2016
    Lost her toes to a infection. i can't kill her so i really need help
     
  2. cavemanrich

    cavemanrich Overrun With Chickens

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    Fist [​IMG]

    Your lil chick can live without toes. I had in the past a chicken that lost her toes possibly to osteoporosis. She was left with just the pads on her feet. Did everything just fine. Had no problem landing on a flat roost board. . I named her Cotton, after Hank Hills Father, From King of the Hill cartoon show.
    WISHING YOU BEST [​IMG]
     
  3. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

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    Animals don't regard themselves as disabled, they adapt and get along fine in their own way.
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. Pork Pie Ken

    Pork Pie Ken Monkey Business Premium Member

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    Hi and welcome to BYC - great advice already given so I'll just say a big hello.

    Cheers
    CT
     
  5. BantamFan4Life

    BantamFan4Life LOOK WHAT YOU MADE ME DO. Premium Member

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    Welcome to BYC! I'm glad you joined us! :)
     
  6. kelly88

    kelly88 Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 18, 2016
    I have 20 hens and one rooster, does he need anything different from wat I feed my hens?
     
  7. cavemanrich

    cavemanrich Overrun With Chickens

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    You may have landed on a thread that deals with a different issue, but thats not a problem. First question is what do you feed your hens.? If they are egg layers, then you may possibly be using layer feed. It is a good feed if most or all of your hens are laying eggs. The ingredient in question in layer feed is calcium. It is at 4%. This is good for chickens that are producing eggs. It is slightly too high for non egg producers and roosters. Those non layers are better served with 2% or 1.5% calcium. So here are some solutions to your situation. Keep using the layer feed, and the rooster may not be getting the IDEAL calcium ration, resulting him a shorter life span. Its not like he is going to die really soon, only that he may not reach his golden years while his hens do. Another factor to take into consideration is if he does free range much, then the wild food will offset the calcium intake. Feeding scratch, and other grains and treats as well as kitchen scraps has same effect. Your other option is to switch to a 2% calcium feed like Alflock. Some brands of similar are 1.8% calcium. You then offer cracked oyster shells free choice. That is a natural source of calcium and your chickens do not overdose eating these cracked pieces. It also is a source of grit. Feed is a processed product and the percentage of calcium is pretty much rammed into the recipients digestive system. Compare that to us humans if we were to take vitamin pills as a supplement. For example.... Dosage says to take 1 pill daily. If we take more than that, it does us harm. (for real).. Now compare that to us getting a fruit basket and enjoying a large quantity of these delicious fruits. Way more vitamins than the single pill. No harm comes to us. Our body knows just how much of what ingredient it needs to extract from the delicious fruit we just enjoyed. Chickens' digestive systems work similarly.to ours in that respect.
    Hope this helps you out.
    WISHING YOU BEST and [​IMG]
     

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