How to make a walk-in coop elevated? First coop sketches (pics) inside...

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by jbher, Oct 7, 2013.

  1. jbher

    jbher Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi all!

    I am in the process of sketching out ideas for our very first coop. We plan to start building at the end of this winter (for spring chicks). I have been reading and reading and reading all of these threads about tips and such. I am overwhelmed with information. We live in Wisconsin, right on the border of Minnesota and are part of the Twin Cities. As such, we have hot, muggy summers and bitter cold, snowy winters. Yay for us! I would like to build a coop that we can walk in (as you can see from my very rough drawings - I am leaning towards the look of the one on the far right, or also the one on the left page on top). However, I keep reading about the benefits of having the coop elevated also. Even if it's just a little bit.

    Anyone have ideas on how we can have both a walk-in coop but also elevated? What would we place the coop on to do this? Foundation ideas?

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

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  3. shannondee12

    shannondee12 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think most people raise the coop to keep critters from digging into the coop so you don't need to raise it if you put hardware cloth underneath the floor. I have also seen people use the 12x12 concrete pavers to make a pad to set the coop on. My coop is raised due to the area tends to flood in the spring but its not a walk in style coop.
     
  4. jbher

    jbher Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I was thinking more along the lines of raising it a little so that the air under the coop would be warmer in the winter versus the coop being on the ground? I could be totally off in my thinking... I am also worried that given the size of the coop that being "set" on pavers would not be stable?
     
  5. jbher

    jbher Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm pretty sure that's what our deck is built on - we had to dig the holes 4' deep I believe because of the freezing ground and such. So if I went with the same idea for the coop - would I do those concrete tubes into the ground, then build a wood platform on top of that to build the coop on? I'm hoping to build the coop mostly myself as my husband works a lot of hours and I know I can get more done during the day since I stay home. I helped build our deck as well but I do not consider myself "handy" haha. He would be doing all of digging and concrete stuff. I would be fine with doing the framing stuff.
     
  6. Hokum Coco

    Hokum Coco Overrun With Chickens

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    [​IMG]
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    Sono Tubes would be ideal if you never plan on moving your coop at any date.
    I move my coop and run every year for gardening.
    I use cinder blocks.
    Cinder blocks have a tendency to sink into the soil if positioned as in the bottom photo over a long period of time not as bad if the holes are open and not blind.
    Better results would be accomplished with a solid paver stone as a base or even a pressure treated plank and then laying your blocks on top .
    Size of coop is another factor you will have to consider in your final decision.
    My coop is just a salvaged metal 4x8 footprint shed.
    Basically my coop is blocked under three sides with the front open.
    Plus it has a trailer frame underneath to make moving easier.
    I have to take one wheel off in order to open the double doors.


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    Last edited: Oct 7, 2013
    1 person likes this.
  7. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote: The ground is usually warmer than the air, if the air is below about 50 degrees.
    If you put any type of litter, there will be no difference in the temperatures either way.
    If that is the ONLY reason to raise it, I think it's a waste of effort
     
  8. jbher

    jbher Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Okay our temps get well below freezing and even in the negative digits. I found this coop and noticed it's a bit elevated:
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/eggpluckers-page

    But if I'm going to put it on the ground - I still need something between the wood and the ground - correct? Otherwise wouldn't the wood get rotten from getting wet being against dirt??
     
  9. yogifink

    yogifink Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My Coop
    Yes, it will rot overtime. We all get old and fall apart. Using ground rated treated lumber will help.

    Prop whatever framework you have on block, brick or pillers and then when you are done building use some landscaping stone around the base to prevent draft.

    Or, you could make a complete foundation from block and fill the void with crushed stone, and then build ontop of that foundation.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2013
  10. mdunbar12

    mdunbar12 Out Of The Brooder

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    yogifink--

    I love your elementary coop!! its beautiful! I wish all of the kids best of luck with the birds!
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2013

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