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How to prevent breeding between two different flocks of birds

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by Ivy99, Oct 9, 2015.

  1. Ivy99

    Ivy99 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 28, 2015
    So, exited about the arrival of a great new farm called Grade eh that ships heritage chickens in Canada that I have been looking for for forever, I've decided to get two of there chickens, a laying and drop dead gorgeous breed called the Spitzhaubin and a meat bird called the Maline. You've probably not heard of either of them (but you really should have!!!), but thats not important. The important thing is that I am going to be breeding these birds as I do not want to go broke to keep buying them over and over. Though I will be keeping the birds in separate houses, I let my chickens free range even if there destined for the stew pot, as I find it gives the bird better tasting meat and a fuller life, however short. I just don't want these birds to interbreed, and don't have much experience with roosters in general and if they stick to there own groups or are going to go to war even if they have a fair sized flock of there own.
     
  2. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    [​IMG]

    If you want to keep your breeds pure, you'll have to alternate free ranging times. If you turn them all out together, any rooster will hop on any hen he can catch.
     
  3. Ivy99

    Ivy99 Out Of The Brooder

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    ok thanks!!!
     
  4. attimus

    attimus Chillin' With My Peeps

    The fertility of one roosters action with a hen only lasts for about a month from what I understand. You could possibly just free range them together and plan out ahead when you are going to hatch, if at specific times of the year and separate breeders for the required amount of time.
    Attimus
     
  5. Ivy99

    Ivy99 Out Of The Brooder

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    Ohhh even better. I seriously love it on here everyone's so helpful!!!!!
     
  6. DanEP

    DanEP Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Just make sure you separate them at least 4 weeks before you start collecting eggs to hatch. I have had surprise chicks after only 3 weeks.
     
  7. Mrs. K

    Mrs. K Overrun With Chickens

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    Or you can do a rooster a year. Roosters are generally cheap to buy and easy to come by. Have one rooster cover the flock, but only hatch the eggs that matches his breed. Next year, get the other rooster, and do the same.

    Mrs K
     
  8. HSMomma3

    HSMomma3 Out Of The Brooder

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    If I'm not concerned about "keeping my breed pure", if I'm simply trying to become self-sustaining with my flock (as in, not having to buy new chicks in future years)… can I safely breed my rooster with my hens that are of a different breed? Will the chicks be healthy? Will they be able to hatch healthy chicks for the next generation? Wondering if I need separate coops and runs for the two breeds ... Thanks for the advice!!
     
  9. chicklover 1998

    chicklover 1998 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The mutts of the chicken world are the healthiest because they have the diversity of genetics vs. the inbreeding, line breeding etc. that breeds of chickens are required sometimes to keep the breed pure
     
  10. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    I've hatched mixed breeds for several years. A rooster will breed any hen, they don't recognize breeds, they only recognize female chicken [​IMG]. I've done this for several generations, starting with hatchery stock, and had great results.

    As a bonus in my opinion, I hatch out birds that don't look like anyone else's! Don't get me wrong, I appreciate the beauty of a well bred purebred animal. But, I've had some chickens that are pretty unique and I like that. Don't want to get lost in the crowd, you know [​IMG]
     

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