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How to process runty dark cornish? Is it worth it?

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by Germaine_11.20, Dec 11, 2009.

  1. Germaine_11.20

    Germaine_11.20 Songster

    Jun 6, 2009
    Idaho
    Hi!

    I had to buy 25 dark cornish to get any at all and some are really runts. Has anyone tried processing the runts before and is it even worth it?
     

  2. dancingbear

    dancingbear Songster

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    South Central KY
    Just process as you would any other bird, if that's what you're asking. If you're asking how to do it at all, with any bird, check out the tutorials in the stickies. And, YouTube videos of Joel Salatin's slaughter and evisceration, there are at least 3 of those, I've watched one on slaughter, 2 on evisceration, and they were tremendously helpful to me.

    Dark Cornish are usually meatier than they look, (compared to other breeds) and have good sized breasts and thighs. I'd go for it. But I'm not inclined to waste any of my homegrown meat, runty or not. I fed it, now it can feed me.
     
  3. Germaine_11.20

    Germaine_11.20 Songster

    Jun 6, 2009
    Idaho
    Well, that was what I was thinking too, but there are a few that are supremely runty! I wasn't sure if it was like processing quail (which I haven't done yet, but watched the pics of Monarch doing it)

    But yeah, they will be more like chickens, just really small chickens.

    I appreciate your reply, thank you!
     
  4. Buster52

    Buster52 Songster

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    Geronimo Oklahoma
    How old are they?
     
  5. Germaine_11.20

    Germaine_11.20 Songster

    Jun 6, 2009
    Idaho
    They just turned 12 weeks. There are some that are about the size of my 5 week Delawares, maybe smaller. Then there are some really nice ones.

    But I don't want to have to keep feeding the runts because I would never breed them because they are the slowest and smallest.
     
  6. Buster52

    Buster52 Songster

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    Jan 28, 2009
    Geronimo Oklahoma
    Quote:Well, at 12 weeks, just about any heritage breed is going to be a runt. Mine are 19 weeks and just about right. But I will only be processing the smallest, keeping the biggest roos and pullets for breeding stock.

    I do think you should hold out longer. The wait will be worth it. Even if they are on the small side, they will still be good.
     
  7. Germaine_11.20

    Germaine_11.20 Songster

    Jun 6, 2009
    Idaho
    I am going to wait a bit for the medium birds, but the little guys really aren't growing in the last 4 weeks at all. But thank you. I will wait longer on the other ones.
     

  8. Bossroo

    Bossroo Songster

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    When you butcher all of them, just treat the runts like a 1 lb. game hen that one can get at the local grocery store.
     
  9. Germaine_11.20

    Germaine_11.20 Songster

    Jun 6, 2009
    Idaho
    Honestly, I don't think dressed they would weigh more than 8 oz. (the runty ones that is) I look at them and just shake my head
     
  10. dancingbear

    dancingbear Songster

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    South Central KY
    I got some dark Cornish pullet chicks from MHM a few years ago, they turned out way undersized for the breed. Pretty, and good brooders, but little.
     

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