How to Raise a Good Roo

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by BlueCamas, Sep 19, 2011.

  1. BlueCamas

    BlueCamas Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am going to be getting a roo this month and he will hopefully be just a bitty chick. I want to raise him to be submissive but friendly to me and the other members of my family. I've heard that if you baby your rooster, he will turn mean when he gets older [​IMG] Any advice on raising a gentlemanly rooster?
     
  2. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    My advice, for what it's worth, is to care for him as you would any chick - making sure he is warm enough, good food and clean water, observe his behavior to make sure he is healthy. Otherwise ignore him. Don't baby him, don't pet him, just let him be a rooster. They have a job to do and that doesn't include being anyone's pet.
     
  3. poofball

    poofball Out Of The Brooder

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    What breed is he ? Some breeds are very docile he may be a nice one .
     
  4. extraordinaryfowl

    extraordinaryfowl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hold him a lot and don't make him jumpy when he is small(scare, drop, kick, or drop-kick lol(as much as possible)). When I first started in chickens and just had half a dozen a year or so, I would hold them all, and my first rooster turned out to be a very, very friendly bird, and now he is a very old guy and we still get along. Now though with all the birds I raise yearly I don't have time to handle them all, and those roosters generally turn out alright, though not extremely friendly.
     
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  5. Nitrostreak

    Nitrostreak Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It definitely has some dependance on breed, but I can tell you all the roosters in my flock are very sweet. Not one has challenged me yet, though I keep a sharp eye out.

    I'd say don't treat him any different from any other chick: be firm with him. Whenever one of my chicks, especially a rooster, pecked at my hand I'd tap it on the beak. Not hard enough to actually hurt, but enough to give them a bit of a startle. Only my Easter Egger rooster has shown even the slightest bit of defiance, and he quickly submitted and scooted off the minute I went tromping straight toward him [​IMG]

    Good luck with raising your rooster C:
     
  6. Katy

    Katy Flock Mistress

    Raise him as a chicken not a pet. I don't handle any of my chickens anymore than needed, but especially the cockerals and roos.
     
  7. Beekissed

    Beekissed True BYC Addict

    Quote:
    gritsar My advice, for what it's worth, is to care for him as you would any chick - making sure he is warm enough, good food and clean water, observe his behavior to make sure he is healthy. Otherwise ignore him. Don't baby him, don't pet him, just let him be a rooster. They have a job to do and that doesn't include being anyone's pet.

    I agree X 10. All my roos have been good flockmasters and nonaggressive with this method. The few times I've had to "school" roos they were roos that I had not raised personally from a chick.

    Even those roos required little intervention and learned quickly who rules the roost and never needed taught that again.

    Baby and pet your hens, let the roo be the dignified patriarch he needs to be....my best advice.​
     
  8. BlueCamas

    BlueCamas Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks guys, I don't have the little guy yet, but I was thinking about an Ameraucana, a Golden Campine, a D' uccle, or maybe a Barnevelder. So the main part is to treat him like a man [​IMG]
     
  9. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    I baby mine sometimes, sometimes give them no special treatment. Most dominiques or American games with a few California greys or crosses of dominiques with other two breeds. Only those that have at least some California grey in them are a problem. Genetics has overwhelming influence on rooster behavior, environment (your hand) may have some but definantly less effect.
     
  10. allpeepedout

    allpeepedout Chillin' With My Peeps

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    There seem to be at least two schools of thought: 1. Don't pet, and he'll remain respectful / fearful, and never challenge you. 2. Raise as pet and train. I did the latter and it has worked out fine, but I'm sure it doesn't always turn out that way. Depends also if you have experience training animals and have the interest and time.

    I handled my roo extensively as a chick, but never hand fed, as I never want to be mugged for treats. The moment he became aggressive and pecked my leg at 5 months I was ready with a response that was effective. I had to work with him a few times over a couple of weeks to make the message sink in.

    If you search the rooster threads here, you will find specific techniques that work for many roos and people, such as pushing down on the roo's body and neck firmly but gently until they submit, as he would do breeding a hen, carrying him around, stalking, a few moments upside down, etc. I also just spent considerable time in my roo's territory WITHOUT challenging or dominating him, as suggested in a Mother Earth News article. Pick your battles and don't be unnecessarily domineering. My roo knows I am kind and a source of good things. You can search that site for other good articles on handling roos. Once you allow bad behavior to become a habit, your task is much more difficult. If you expect to address bad behavior, wear long pants, closed shoes, long sleeves, gloves... use common sense!

    I think defensive aggression is natural and to be expected in a healthy intact male animal whose job is to defend his flock. Chickens are not the smartest yet are surprisingly trainable, and aggression can be averted. On the other hand, other people want or expect any roo they keep to be naturally docile or fearful. Everybody has different expectations and willingness to make an effort/take a risk, and every bird is different.
     
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2011

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