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How to shoot a trapped animal?

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by Renthorin, Aug 1, 2011.

  1. Renthorin

    Renthorin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 13, 2011
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    I know this sounds silly but I have 65 bucks invested in my live trap and I don't want to shoot at it with a 12 gauge.

    so...if the coon/possum/whatever is inside the trap...how do you dispose of it? I can let it out and then shoot at it while it runs away but that is asking for crazy shots gone wild.

    What do you folks do to humanely kill them?

    I have .22, .357, .40, .44, .308, and 12 gauge. I'm thinking the .22 should be enough but I want it to be quick so the critter doesn't suffer.

    Advice?


    Will
     
  2. flyboy129

    flyboy129 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 27, 2011
    When I do it, I use my .22. The quickest kill I can think of is a shot to the back of the neck just below the head. I have done it several times this way and it is pretty quick. Yes sometimes it is hard to do, but I just think of the chicken that had to suffer at the paws of the trappee. Good luck.
     
  3. Renthorin

    Renthorin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 13, 2011
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    is the coon thrashing around in the cage at the time or do they tend to sit still?

    Afterwards, do you bury the animal or toss it into the woods so other critters can dine?
     
  4. Kamokid95

    Kamokid95 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 28, 2011
    ive always got a buddy to get a nuse around the trapped critters neck and depending on how big it is, i would just wack it really hard with a 2x4. sounds cruel, but its a very quick death if you hit hard enough. other times, my buddys dad got his .22. 1 shot behing the ear.
     
  5. greymane

    greymane Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I use a .22, but have never had one that didn't die immediately. I have read on here about Super Colibri rounds for the .22. I have not tried them, but they are primer only (no extra powder), so they are very quiet, but also supposed to be very effective for this type of thing. They also don't penetrate, so much less chance of damaging the trap.
     
  6. greymane

    greymane Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Snyder County, PA
    That said, I did choose NOT to shoot one today. Walked out to let the chickens out and saw the one trap was tripped. As I got closer, I saw the distinct black and white pattern. It was a young skunk. I didn't want the trap (or me) ruined, and we have a "quick set" trap that just requires you to lift the handle, so I took a long pole and lifted then handle. I propped the pole so it kept the trap open and put some distance between me and the trap. The little skunk walked out and wandered into the woods. [​IMG]
     
  7. ddroland

    ddroland Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 15, 2010
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    Quote:.22 Hollow Point to the head, no fancy way to do it. All animals are going to flop around a bit but they are dead on impact. I have a lot of vultures around my place and they appreciate the free meal, plus they clean things up in a couple of hours.
     
  8. aprophet

    aprophet Chillin' With My Peeps

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    .22 short up close works well
     
  9. goldtopper

    goldtopper Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Often a coon will be so ticked, you just stick the barrel of the rifle in the trap. He'll bite it, making your point of aim very easy.
     
  10. bakerjw

    bakerjw Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I use a bright flashlight to get them stopped in place and then slip the barrel of my rifle through a slot in the cage. A .22 long rifle to the center of the forehead aiming into the base of the brain is all that it takes. It was hard the first time as I hate killing anything but it gets much easier with time.

    Be warned though. Once the brain stops getting a blood supply it fires muscles and they start jumping and flopping about. I bleed out my chickens when I butcher them and the same thing happens to them. I shot a raccoon Friday night and my SIL came out to see what was going on after hearing the shot. I still had the flashlight on the raccoon and she saw it doing the death leaps and was troubled by it even though the animal was already brain dead. She knows how much damage that they can cause in the garden and how they will get into a house in search of food.

    I opt for shooting first or drowning second. imho giving them to dogs to tear up is just plain cruel.
     

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