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how to slow down the maturity of quail

Discussion in 'Quail' started by adorable, Mar 29, 2013.

  1. adorable

    adorable Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have read somewhere , Not to sure if it was here. But to slow down the maturity of jumbo coturnix quail is by lights.. I think it was either 2 hours on and 2 hours off ... Or it was 2 weeks on or off. Does someone know.
     
  2. kenazzo2000

    kenazzo2000 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    whats the purpose ?
     
  3. adorable

    adorable Chillin' With My Peeps

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    so they dont mature so fast and you get bigger jumbo quail
     
  4. James Marie

    James Marie Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 26, 2012
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    Last edited: Mar 29, 2013
  5. Ntsees

    Ntsees Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've seen that you can slow down maturity for things like fish and insects, but I do not think you can slow down maturity on birds. Giving them more or less light only delay or give them an early start on egg laying and that applies for both young and old birds.
     
  6. James Marie

    James Marie Out Of The Brooder

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    I think most research done on increased size was not to delay maturity but to increase body mass before maturity....lighting will increase or decrease egg production in adult hens...but they will mature with or without lighting conditions...just nature....The results were less than hoped for in my project and didn't feel it would work for my farm production....
     
  7. James the Bald

    James the Bald Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 6, 2013
    In your other research last year on lighting, you made the statement:, "I'm looking now at the temperature we keep the A/C set at and the feed we use....and of course always working to improve the breeding stock.... always looking to improve any way I can."

    Have you conducted any research with temperature (A/C)?. I'm currently thinking about putting my quail on an enclosed patio where they would be shielded from the direct sun, but still be exposed to Alabama's humid summer temps.
     
  8. dc3085

    dc3085 Chillin' With My Peeps

    They need the vitamins they get from the light to promote healthy growth. Just like humans need vitamin D. Bigger quail will be achieved with a good feed program and selective breeding.
     
  9. James Marie

    James Marie Out Of The Brooder

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    Much research has been done on high temperature and negative growth with Coturnix...the most impressive was done in Turkey back in the 80's...most university's and research departments recommend a environmental temperature of between 65 to 80 degrees....temperatures higher than 80 degrees has increased loss in growth... egg production and mortality....temperatures below 40 degrees will have effects on growth and egg production but at much lower levels than high temperatures....
    I've worked with several levels of climate control in our production room....I find we have the best overall results of growth..egg production...fertility...and mortality rates with maintaining the temperature at 74-78 degrees....
    as for daylight and vitamin D ....yes it does make a difference in growth and health...our doors that exit the room are glass doors to allow natural light in...our lighting system has Daylight type full spectrum light bulbs and our feed is custom blended for our farm by a local mill and has added Vitamin D...omega 3 and other vitamins and minerals for enhanced performance and is a complete grain base diet...the blend is very close to the Coturnix Feed diet formulated and recommended by Mississippi State University and Professor Tom W. Smith, PhD., Entension Poultry Specialist.... ...we are very pleased with the results of this feed blend...
    During hot summer days when most Coturnix egg production and fertility drops our flocks egg production and fertility maintains the same levels...and we don't have an increase in mortality due to heat stress like birds exposed to summer heat waves...higher production and less mortality covers the additional cost of the electrical bill during the summer of less than $ 20.00 a day....
     
  10. James the Bald

    James the Bald Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you for that info.
     

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