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How to stop a 8 month old Rott from biting. HELP

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by terrilhb, Oct 31, 2011.

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  1. terrilhb

    terrilhb Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 11, 2010
    Georgia
    My DD has a 8 month old Rott. He has always been really sweet. But here recently he has started grabbing kind of like biting. He does not break the skin but holds on tight. It really hurts. I have tried everything I know to stop him. It is really getting old. He really bites when you won't let him do something he wants to. He just got me. If it does not stop he is going to have to go to someone who can handle it before he gets to much older. And really hurts someone.
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2011
  2. chickenzoo

    chickenzoo Emu Hugger

    If you think it is out of play, and not aggression, I have seen dog trainers say that you make a very high pitch yelp noise, fold up your arms to your body and turn your back towards them, and make no eye contact until he stops the behavior and is still. It is explained that the high pitch yelp mimics a dogs littermat's yelp when they play to rough, and folding up your arms keeps the dog from trying to grab again and turning your back and avoiding eye contact tells them that play is over and makes you less interesting to them. Do this every time he is rough, and fold up your arms and turn your back anytime he even thinks about biting. I have never had to use it, but this is what I've seen....... [​IMG]
     
  3. Jamie_Dog_Trainer

    Jamie_Dog_Trainer Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 8, 2008
    Washington State
    Terri, is your DD an adult? If not, they she shouldn't be dealing with this dog on her own. Either way the behavior is dangerous and yes it is aggression. I am dealing with a Briard right now who does this to his owner. The owner is a very "soft" woman with a big heart and this dog has been running her ragged for about four months.

    The behavior usually stems from inconsistencies within leadership, lack of training, the dog being bored out of it's mind, and a naturally controlling temperament. In effect it sounds like this puppy has not learned that the behavior is wrong, and also has not learned what is right either. A good, consistent training, exercise and daily routine will help tremendously. As will crating and a leash drag around the house. Crating is for your daughter's sanity -- and your own. Put the dog away when he is not listening and starts to escalate behavior. A leash-drag in doors automatically gives you better control over the pup's body.

    A Rottie needs firm and consistent leadership to be a decent dog. Training goes a long way to assist the owner and dog bonding properly and solidly. If this behavior isn't addressed soon he'll get more and more controlling, the mouthing behavior will escalate into real biting when he's not being "obeyed" by the family.
     
  4. Redyre Rotties

    Redyre Rotties Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,542
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    Jul 8, 2009
    North Carolina, USA
    My advice:

    Start controlling this dog's life, every aspect of it.

    1) Institute crate training. If the dog is already crate trained, he should sleep in the crate, and have scheduled time in the crate each day. He must sit and wait to be told to go in the crate, and he must wait until released to come out. Use a collar and lead to control him and don't let him go in until you say, and when you say, toss in a treat for him to get. When it is time for him to come out, use the crate door to teach him not to come out until you say "come out". Yes, he might run into the crate door a time or two as you close it in a timely manner if he starts out before he is released. Be consistent, and persistent.

    2) Feed all meals in the crate. Same drill. He goes in when you say, put in the food bowl, let him eat, then remove the food bowl, and don't let him come out of the crate until you say.

    3) Practice the trade game. 10 repetitions twice per day. Put the dog on lead. Give him a favorite toy. Once he has it, offer him a small treat. As he drops the toy, say DROP IT, while at the same time you give him the treat. Practice until he drops without you offering the treat, and then use the treat as a reward.

    4) Practicethe recall game twice per day if possible.

    Do not allow this dog in your bedroom at all. Do not allow him to be free during mealtimes. (crate him) Find a good trainer who uses positive reinforcement, and this dog needs to get into training class or take private instruction with his owner as soon as possible.

    Most of all, have the humans in his life use their most powerful training tool, THEIR BRAIN, and take every opportunity to positively manage this dog's life. Keep a drag line (a short leash) on his collar when he is in the house so that you can control him from mouthing anyone. Keep toys handy to pop into his mouth when he feels the need to clamp on something.

    Work to find this dog doing things RIGHT and reward him. Instead of correcting him, manage him so that he cannot do wrong, and work work work to find chances to reward him for doing right.

    go to YouTube and watch Kikopup's channel to learn how to manage dogs in a positive manner.

    Good luck.
     
  5. watchdogps

    watchdogps Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,375
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    Jun 4, 2011
    Central Ohio
    All good advice, but I would add that these things should be done in such a manner that you do not create a head to head confrontation. If this dog really believes he is in charge, he will rise to the occasion and someone may get seriously injured. taking the sidestep into leadership by structure and consistency is a much better and safer way than to try to directly take charge. At 5 times the strength of a human, even an 8 month old rott is no joke.
     
  6. terrilhb

    terrilhb Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 11, 2010
    Georgia
    Thank you everyone for your answers. The puppy is probably going to have to go. She is not going to do what needs to be done. I have alot alot of animals. I could put in the time scince he is so great with the chickens, goats, and guinea's but if she will not give him to me. I will not. It was not my intention to have a Rott to protect my animals. I wanted a LGD. I just want him to have a fantastic life and family. Thanks again.
     
  7. Iowa Roo Mom

    Iowa Roo Mom Resistance Is Futile

    Apr 30, 2009
    Keokuk County
    I always made a loud "yip" noise and then pinched my pup's lip, fairly hard. It let him know that I wasn't playing and that it hurt.
     
  8. Redyre Rotties

    Redyre Rotties Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,542
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    Jul 8, 2009
    North Carolina, USA
    Quote:I would not advise ANYONE who is having possible aggression issues with an intact male Rottweiler to inflict pain on them. This could cause an escalation of the issue, including getting the person bitten or injured.

    I am corresponding with the OP privately, and working to find her some hands on training resources in her area. This is not an issue that can be resolved by reading on an internet forum, JMO.
     
  9. NovaAman

    NovaAman Overrun With Chickens

    I agree with Redyre, I had a rot, and he was very male aggressive. Very female and child protective. My ex hubby, my father and my grandfather were the only men that this dog could be by and not have to worry. I had to keep him under tight control around all other men. We did not use a crate though. I used a back mud room for him. I eventually had to put a lock on the door though, cuz this smarty pants learned how to turn the handle! He was the best dog ever. BUT, he was controlled. NOT the other way around. Great dog.

    Take care to be careful though. IF you are going to have the dog in your house, you need to be pack leader. This guy can not. And no offense intended, but your child is being irresponsible if the behavior is not addressed properly by her. I'd go ahead and invest the time and effort. He will be a happier dog in the end.
     
  10. Jamie_Dog_Trainer

    Jamie_Dog_Trainer Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 8, 2008
    Washington State
    I think Terri is on the right track with not having this dog at her house. Her plate is already full and this dog needs another home where he can be dealt with appropriately. Her daughter has not shown the inclination to raise the dog the way he needs, so sadly, a new home is probably best. He needs more time and more of a concrete relationship with his owner. [​IMG]
     
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