How to train a puppy/rooster not to chase/attack chickens/people?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by amiachicknorwat, Mar 27, 2016.

  1. amiachicknorwat

    amiachicknorwat Chirping

    216
    25
    81
    Aug 3, 2015
    Yeah, I've got two dovetailing problems. A rooster (2nd in command) that attacks me and others. At first I didn't retaliate cuz it was just a peck at my lower legs, none higher than the knee, none drawing more blood than a superficial peckpoint. Then Ivan The Terrible (name of offending bird) attacked an albeit offensive child visiting. No real harm was done, tears aside. But now i realize the liability, particularly since I just got a border collie puppy, whose raison d'etre is to chase (herd) animals. I don't want Ivan pecking out the beautiful eyes of my loving puppy either.

    So I ask you pet-loving flock masterful helpful folks for training techniques to keep roosters from attacking and puppies from chasing. Any suggestions welcome. Thanks, Nick
     
  2. Folly's place

    Folly's place Free Ranging

    10,695
    6,713
    576
    Sep 13, 2011
    southern Michigan
    Your rooster will NEVER be safe, until he's in someone's crock pot. Your smart puppy will be so trainable, and with good management should be a huge asset. Mary
     
  3. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Free Ranging Premium Member

    11,244
    11,058
    711
    Mar 15, 2010
    On the MN prairie.
    I agree - train the puppy, eat the rooster.
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. amiachicknorwat

    amiachicknorwat Chirping

    216
    25
    81
    Aug 3, 2015
    Thanks Mary. I guess you meant people, children, puppies etc will NEVER be safe from an attacky rooster. I'm not worried about the rooster's security. The actual alpha rooster tries to help keep Terrible, Ivan The in check. We have a few other roosters and none of them attack anyone except eachother at times in re-establishing and maintaining pecking order. That's what made me think his behaviour is aberrant and so could be reined in thru training. After all, chickens are domesticated. I guess yeah, not as pets, but enough to be moulded thru training. On other hand, seems I have to accept he (Ivan) has accepted his role as enforcer. Except that he usually attacks gratuitously, coming unreasonably out of nowhere. Maybe I'll enroll him in a cockfight, hmmmmmm... Nick
     
  5. Folly's place

    Folly's place Free Ranging

    10,695
    6,713
    576
    Sep 13, 2011
    southern Michigan
    A rooster (maybe eight pounds?) attacking the giants who bring food every day is an jerk who shouldn't reproduce and isn't smart enough to be safely 'retrained'. In his case, 'domesticated' means a total lack of sense. A wild chicken would run away every time! Mary
     
  6. Violetsfeathers

    Violetsfeathers Songster

    2,225
    295
    196
    Feb 22, 2015
    Minnesota
    My Coop
    I say, put the puppy and the rooster in a pen together, let the rooster teach the puppy not to chase chickens, then eat him.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by