how will i know if my roo will be "mean"

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by random, Feb 5, 2009.

  1. random

    random Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 5, 2009
    australia
    i have a rir roo what signs can i look for that he will be "mean"? (if he will be)
    hes about 6 mths old and so far hasnt even tried to attack peck or anything.
    i have got a little girl and the most contact ill let them have is, yes they share a yard but she isnt allowed to chase/ try to catch him....ever...would hate for him to feel threatened and attack...and she can only pat if im holding him
    we have 3 little chicks who he tolerates really well and is alreading starting to protect them
    he loves to be patted/ scratched on the neck and seems placid...but how do i know? what can i look for as he matures?
    not saying he will be "mean" he may be fantasic...but would like to be sure i know the diff between regular roo behaviour and a "mean" roo
     
  2. B. Saffles Farms

    B. Saffles Farms Mr. Yappy Chickenizer

    Nov 23, 2008
    Madisonville, TN
    Most of them like to come after you and flog you. Youll know it, when and if he decides to be mean.
     
  3. random

    random Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 5, 2009
    australia
    i keep seeing this word...flog...here...to me...it means pretty much a good ol' smack...like when ur kid does something really naughty that is dangerous and scares u! or it means to steal something...so im pretty sure it doesnt mean either of those things....so what does it mean here?
    ta for that
     
  4. Kim_NC

    Kim_NC Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 27, 2009
    Mt Airy, NC
    Quote:'to flog' is to beat, whip or thrash something. With poultry (chickens, turkey, geese) it means being attacked and beaten with their wings and beak, and spurred in the case of a rooster.
     
  5. B. Saffles Farms

    B. Saffles Farms Mr. Yappy Chickenizer

    Nov 23, 2008
    Madisonville, TN
    Quote:'to flog' is to beat, whip or thrash something. With poultry (chickens, turkey, geese) it means being attacked and beaten with their wings and beak, and spurred in the case of a rooster.

    Yep what Kim said.
     
  6. greenesacres

    greenesacres Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 9, 2008
    Kentucky
    I have had the most gentle roosters. My kids would carry them around, eat from your hands, etc. and when you turned your back WHAM! No clues whatsoever that they would be mean. I had to get rid of them because if they jumped high enough they could really hurt a two year old. My five year old got some mean scratches on this back not to mention the fear that it causes!
     
  7. Daycare Mom

    Daycare Mom Chickens, Cuddly and Delicious

    Apr 9, 2008
    Conklin, Michigan
    I have a couple of roos right now that I will be keeping a close eye on. I think that if you are still carrying this one around and it lets you pet it you are probably ok. I don't know that I will ever fully trust a roo.
     
  8. random

    random Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 5, 2009
    australia
    i dont trust humans! wouldnt trust a chook or any other animal too much for that matter! lol ta mate
     
  9. chookchick

    chookchick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 18, 2008
    Olympia WA
    He is going through adolescence right now, and his behavior could change in an instant. He is most likely to attack when he feels that the hens are being threatened--which may be as little as your girl picking them up or petting them. You can tell he is becoming protective when he tries to "herd" the hens, or does a rooster dance with a dropped wing. But there may be no signs before jumps on her, that is why I don't think a child should have free access to a rooster until they are old enough to defend themselves--too risky!
     
  10. pixiechic

    pixiechic Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 23, 2008
    North GA
    I had two RI Red roos and they were very laid-back and non-threatening. They definitely deferred to the alpha barred rock and buff orp boys. They were handsome too, I hated to rehome them but I just had too many roos for my girls.

    It sounds like your RIR roo is very docile, but there's no way to predict how he'll act when his hormones kick in, which will be any minute now. Just to be sure, I would never leave a small child and a rooster alone together, even for a minute. Even without full-grown spurs, a rooster could really hurt a child if he felt threatened.
     

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