Humane way of farming and feeding worms, or any bugs, to hens?

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by Sire12, Aug 29, 2016.

  1. Sire12

    Sire12 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 29, 2016
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    I want to start a mealworm farm for my 2 new hens to have a steady supply for them, I've done the research on how to keep and breed them and that but I have a bit of a conscience about raising hundreds of bugs that I'm eventually going to feed to my pets it just feels kind of cruel, I've considered only feeding them the adult Beatles that have died naturally on their own but I would probably have more mealworms that I could handle if I waited that long, or killing the mealworms beforehand by putting them in the freezer overnight which I've read is the humane way to kill them to make dried mealworms, but I'm guessing the hens would much rather have the living worms if they had the option so killing the worms first might probably be a bit stupid if albeit less painful for worms, I guess it just boils down to whether they actually feel pain when they are being eaten? I assumed so since the hens have no teeth and can't chew them that they are digested whilst still alive, is this the case or do they die relatively fast after being eaten? I know this probably sounds very silly lol and I'm not some crazy die hard vegan or hippie or whatever just curious as I haven't really found an answer regarding this anywhere else

    Also, is there any other kind of bug that you can farm in containers and which have small lifespans? So that the adults would lay their eggs and then die a few weeks later then I could just feed my hens the dead ones?

    Any info is appreciated thanks
     
  2. Sire12

    Sire12 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 29, 2016
    Northern Ireland
    Bump
     
  3. Tylexie

    Tylexie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 11, 2015
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    I've heard that chickens may like crickets. They live about 3 months, and are quite easy to breed.
     

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